Staff, Author at Green Market Report - Page 21 of 176

StaffFebruary 10, 2022
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4min9370

Schwazze,(OTCQX: SHWZ) has closed the transaction to acquire Colorado-based MCG, LLC also known as Emerald Fields.  Emerald Fields is the owner and operator of two retail cannabis dispensaries, located in Manitou Springs and Glendale, Colorado.  This acquisition is part of the company’s ongoing retail expansion plan in Colorado and New Mexico, bringing the total number of dispensaries the Company operates to 32.

Total consideration for the acquisition is $29 million and will be paid as 60% cash and 40% Schwazze common stock upon closing.  This is an estimated 3.8 multiple on 2021 Adjusted EBITDA.

“Our team is delighted to add the Emerald Fields Cannaboutiques to our growing portfolio of dispensaries and are eager to welcome the team to Schwazze. Manitou Springs and Glendale are attractive locations and valuable assets to our overall growth plan as we continue to build out Colorado.  Our team is excited to add another store brand to our house of brands.”  said Justin Dye, Schwazze’s CEO.

High Tide

High Tide Inc. (Nasdaq: HITI) has completed its acquisition of Bud Room Inc. as well as assignments of the vendors’ shareholder loans, for C$3.6 million and acquired all rights to the customized Fastendr retail kiosk and smart locker technology and Bud Room’s retail cannabis store located in Ottawa, Ontario.

The company said in a statement that the acquisition will provide the following elements:

  • High Tide through this acquisition gains ownership of the Fastendr technology which will improve the Company’s competitive advantage in bricks-and mortar cannabis retail.
  • A pilot conducted at Bud Room’s Ottawa location found that over 60% of customers preferred to use the Fastendr™ kiosks and spent over 20% more when doing so.
  • All existing and future Canna Cabana locations will be equipped with this customized and innovative kiosk and smart locker technology as it delivers a faster customer experience in busier retail locations while also enabling the efficient operation of smaller footprint stores.
  • High Tide intends to license this technology to third party retailers starting with the cannabis industry, and expanding to other retail sectors across North America and beyond.
  • This technology provides High Tide with potential new revenue generation, data collection and monetization opportunities from third party retail locations, and will further enhance the value of its Cabannalytics data insights offering.

Bud Room’s founder and Chief Executive Officer, Michael DiDuca will remain engaged with the High Tide team assisting in launching Fastendr. High Tide granted 13,538 stock options to DiDuca exercisable at C$6.25 per High Tide Share for a period of 3 years.


StaffFebruary 10, 2022

5min10440

Lantern

Akele Parnell, Head of Equity Partnerships at Lantern

  1. When did you formally enter the cannabis space? 

I entered the cannabis space in Feb 2018 when I joined Green Thumb Industries as an in-house counsel working on their market expansion activities.

  1. What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry? 

I entered the cannabis space for several reasons. For one, I’m a fan of the plant and its ability to foster human connection and creative expression. Another reason I joined the industry is that I wanted to help shape the industry to provide Black and Brown communities with the opportunity to build generational wealth from a plant that has been used to oppress our communities for generations. Lastly, I wanted the opportunity to own my own cannabis business.

  1. Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why? 

Long term I think there’s more untapped financial opportunity in the regulated industry for Black Americans than the traditional industry. And opportunities in the traditional industry will only decrease as time goes on. But given the current barriers to entry for Black Americans, it may make more economic sense for many to continue to participate in the traditional industry for the time being. So long term, there’s more opportunity in the regulated industry, but right now, it’s probably easier to make money, and more money, in the unregulated market. That said, obviously, the non-financial risks in the traditional industry are much higher for Black Americans than other races (risk of arrest, prosecution, asset forfeiture, incarceration, etc.), so it’s probably smart to start to make the transition.

  1. What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

 To date, I think Oakland’s social equity program has been the most successful. To my knowledge, it’s brought the most Black and Brown cannabis entrepreneurs to market of any social equity program. Granted, the California market is extremely saturated so operating is tough for everyone. But at least Oakland-based Black entrepreneurs have a real shot at getting a license and the chance to compete.

  1. What is your personal goal for 2022?
    My personal goals for 2022 are to successfully complete our first incubator cohort in NJ (the New Jersey Cannabis Project), launch an incubator in NY (the New York Cannabis Project), and get my dispensary and craft grow businesses up and running in Chicago. So I have a lot of work to do in 2022, but if all that gets done, I’ll feel pretty good going into 2023.


StaffFebruary 9, 2022
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5min6400

It’s time for your Daily Hit of cannabis financial news for February 9, 2022.

On the Site

Canopy Growth

Canopy Growth Corporation (TSX: WEED) (NASDAQ: CGC) announced its financial results for the third quarter fiscal 2022 ended December 31, 2021 as revenue dropped from last year as Canadian cannabis sales fell. Canopy reported net revenue of $141 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2022, which was a decline of 8% versus the same time period in 2021. Canopy said that total global cannabis net revenue of $83 million in the quarter declined 20% over the third quarter in 2021. On a positive note, net revenue increased 7% sequentially. Canopy also delivered a net loss of $115 million, which is a $714 million improvement versus last year. The company said this was “driven primarily by lapping material non-cash asset impairment and restructuring charges in Q3 FY2021 and Other Income totaling $34 million during Q3 FY2022 mostly attributable to non-cash fair value changes of $59 million.”

Clever Leaves

Clever Leaves Holdings Inc. (NASDAQ: CLVR) announced a big cash burn, rising net losses, and a new CEO. The global cannabis company released its preliminary unaudited financial results for the fourth quarter and full-year ended December 31, 2021, along with its 2022 outlook. In the fourth quarter, Clever Leaves said its revenue is expected to increase 25% to approximately $4.2 million compared to $3.3 million. However, the net loss is expected to range between approximately $17.1 million and $17.5 million compared to $0.9 million. The company also said it has burned through its cash levels of $79.5 million bringing it down to $37 million at the end of 2021.

Klutch

Ohio-based Klutch Cannabis looks to have raised $10 million as the producer is keen on securing licenses. According to Pitchbook, the company raised $10.9 million as of February 1, 2022. It is said to be convertible debt financing from undisclosed investors and the funding will be converted to Series C, D, and E. It could be money that is anticipating Klutch winning some dispensary licenses. Klutch currently possesses cultivation and processing licenses but the company wasn’t able to secure a dispensary license during the original process in 2018. Klutch did not respond to a request for confirmation of the capital raise.

In Other News

Hexo

On January 19, 2022, Hexo said that it would reduce SG&A expenses by 30 per cent by Fiscal Year End 2023. As part of that initiative, the company cut 180 positions, resulting in annual savings of approximately $15 million on an annualized basis. Half of these positions are related to the previously announced closure of the Stellarton facility. The remaining reductions are related to reducing back-office positions where there is significant overlap as a result of recent acquisitions and simplifying HEXO’s operating model to drive clearer accountability. The plan is expected to generate incremental cash flow of approximately $37.5 million in fiscal 2022 and an additional anticipated and approximate $135 million in fiscal 2023 for a total of $175 million over the two years, from a combination of cost reductions and anticipated organic revenue growth.


StaffFebruary 9, 2022
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5min5650

Curaleaf

Raheem Uqdah, Director of Corporate Social Responsibility at Curaleaf

  1. When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

    I joined the cannabis industry when I was hired at Grassroots Cannabis in February 2019.

  2. What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?
    The decision to join the industry just felt right. I was lucky enough to always find work that aligned with my internal compass and this opportunity was no different. The idea of being able to work in and help build an emerging industry was incredibly enticing to me. Since deciding to dive in I have never looked back.

  3. Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?
    I think the answer to this question speaks to the newness of the industry. If this industry is easier for Black folks to enter, it is because we can engage before we are shut out. What I have found in cannabis are passionate people who are given the ability to grow and grow quickly because we are building the industry every day. This isn’t a legacy space with set processes and hierarchy, so the potential is almost unhindered if you are prepared to take a risk and capitalize on the opportunity.

    All of this isn’t to say that the doors are flung open. I am constantly talking about the requirement for large sums of cash to get started in the plant-touching side of this business. Of course, we have the context of systemic forces like housing or banking discrimination or drug policy enforcement that have disadvantaged Black communities historically. The unfortunate reality is that these historic injustices are compounded in the present when we ask applicants from these communities to front hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in cash to participate. Qualifications built on the foundations of societal inequity will further the inequity they are looking to address, and we need to think deeply about the outcomes and realities of these programs to make an impact.

  4. What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.
    Selfishly, I want to say Rooted in Good and the work we are doing at Curaleaf. I say that because we have a fantastic team constantly working to figure out how to disrupt “business as usual,” and a company culture where everyone has bought in. This isn’t a simple initiative or one-and-done project for us. This is how we do business, and everyone is excited about it. From our recent gathering of prospective Social Equity Applicants and Curaleaf Business Development team members to our cross-functional environmental task force, we are seeding these practices throughout our functional departments.

  5. What is your personal goal for 2022?
    Personally, my plans this year are to get out into the world more. My family is really into camping and cycling, so the last two years stuck inside for most of the summer have not been fun. We are already planning some fun trips out of the city this season.
    Professionally, this year is about measuring impact and doubling down on what is working. I cannot wait to kick off our sustainability projects here. The industry has a huge environmental footprint, and I am excited that  Curaleaf will be leading the industry in addressing this pressing topic.


StaffFebruary 8, 2022
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7min8691

It’s time for your Daily Hit of cannabis financial news for February 8, 2022.

On The Site

Illinois

Cannabis sales in Illinois for the month of January grew 32% over last year but fell sequentially by 14% from December. Last Friday, the Illinois Department of Professional and Financial Regulation released cannabis monthly sales figures and then on Monday, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) released its latest statistics for the medical cannabis program. So far in 2022, 2,645,046 items were sold in January. In-state residents spent over $81 million while out-of-state residents spent roughly $35 million for a total of $117 million. In January 2021, sales were $88.8 million in total, while December sales topped $137 million. The state saw a slight growth in sales between 2020’s December and 2021’s January so there was no precedent for this drop.

InterCure

Israeli-based InterCure Ltd. (NASDAQ: INCR) (TSX: INCR.U) announced its preliminary financial results for the fourth quarter of 2021. All amounts are expressed in Canadian dollars ($) or New Israeli Shekels (NIS). Revenue is estimated to be over $31 million, three times greater than the fourth quarter of 2020 and representing sequential growth of over 24%. The company did not disclose whether there was a net income or loss. The company also stated that it expects the full-year revenue to be $87 million, almost 250% growth year-over-year (YOY). Revenue growth is expected to continue throughout 2022.

Tilray

Tilray Brands, Inc. (Nasdaq: TLRY) is combining its medical marijuana brands and naming it Tilray Medical. Tilray said it is bringing together the medical divisions from Aphria and Tilray for one global medical platform. Tilray Medical will feature the brands with one strategy, mission, and vision. “Tilray is the global leader in the advancement of cannabinoid-based medicine, with a focus on providing research-backed medical cannabis products to physicians, pharmacies, and patients,” said Denise Faltischek, Head of International and Chief Strategy Officer. “By unifying the global medical divisions of Tilray and Aphria under a cohesive strategy and mission, Tilray Medical emerges as the premier global supplier of a portfolio of high-quality, effective medical cannabis brands and products for patients in need around the world.” Tilray acquired Aphria and officially closed the deal in May of 2021.

Psychedelics

Psychedelics are going legitimate, looking to trade a reputation as illicit, illegal party drugs for legal, approved treatments for medical problems like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. At the vanguard is ketamine. Patients are piling into a host of ketamine clinics, including Toronto-based Field Trip Health (OTC: FTRP) and Chicago-based Wesana Health. The drug is taking its place alongside marijuana as once-illegal markets that are now growing industries. Other psychedelics and psychoactive compounds are waiting in the wings. Read more here…

In Other News

Canopy Growth

Law360 reported that Canopy Growth Corp. (NASDAQ: CGC)  has reached a $13 million settlement with a class of investors who say it misled them about the strength of the Canadian cannabis market, according to a court filing urging a New Jersey federal court to give its initial approval of the deal. “Taking into account nearly four years of litigation, the risks and uncertainties of continued litigation, and the significant amount of the recovery, the settlement here is certainly reasonable and should be preliminarily approved,” the investors said.

Sundial

Sundial Growers Inc. (Nasdaq: SNDL) announced that it has received an extension of 180 calendar days to regain compliance with Nasdaq’s minimum bid price requirement. The extension will allow the company to regain compliance if the bid price for the Company’s common shares closes at or above US$1.00 per share for a minimum of 10 consecutive trading days before August 8, 2022.

Flora

Flora Growth Corp. (NASDAQ: FLGC) (“Flora” or the “Company”), a leading all-outdoor cultivator and manufacturer of global cannabis products and brands, announced today the addition of Vessel founder and CEO, James Choe, to its executive team. Choe takes on the role of Chief Strategy Officer of Flora where he will focus on the development of three core pillars – people, design, and community.


StaffFebruary 8, 2022
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3min5450

Israeli-based InterCure Ltd. (NASDAQ: INCR) (TSX: INCR.U) announced its preliminary financial results for the fourth quarter of 2021. All amounts are expressed in Canadian dollars ($) or New Israeli Shekels (NIS). Revenue is estimated to be over $31 million, three times greater than the fourth quarter of 2020 and representing sequential growth of over 24%. The company did not disclose whether there was a net income or loss. The company also stated that it expects the full-year revenue to be $87 million, almost 250% growth year-over-year (YOY). Revenue growth is expected to continue throughout 2022.

InterCure said it plans to file its full financial results for the fourth quarter and full-year 2021 on Tuesday, March 15, 2022.

“InterCure continues to execute, achieving record growth in the quarter ended December 31, 2021, with preliminary revenue anticipated to be $31 million, up by over three times from the fourth quarter of 2020,” said InterCure’s Chief Executive Officer, Alexander Rabinovitch. “We have now achieved eight consecutive quarters of double-digit revenue growth and increased profitability, while also crossing the one-ton mark in GMP medical cannabis products dispensed monthly during the fourth quarter, which is a world record in the GMP-certified cannabis markets. Going forward, we remain focused on maintaining our market-leading position in Israel’s cannabis market while continuing with our international expansion plans. By executing on our profitable growth strategy, InterCure is well positioned to build shareholder value as one of the leaders of the international cannabis industry.”

Additional highlights included in the company’s statement were:

  • Eighth consecutive quarter of high double-digit growth representing an annualized run rate of $124 million.
  • InterCure said it expects continued increases in operating profit, EBITDA, and net profit during the fourth quarter of 2021.
  • Sustained market share growth due to solid demand for Canndoc’s branded products and expansion of the Company’s medical cannabis dispensing operations.
  • Announced European expansion with international cannabis brand Cookies – opening retail locations in Austria and the United Kingdom.
  • Expanded pharmacy chain to 20 locations in Israel.
  • The company surpassed one-ton medical cannabis products dispensed per month in the fourth quarter, representing approximately 30% market share of Israel’s medical cannabis.


StaffFebruary 8, 2022
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5min6310

Cannaclusive

Kassia Graham / Director of Community & Strategy, Cannaclusive

**Pronouns**: She/her/they/them

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

I entered the cannabis space in late 2017 and began working with Cannaclusive. Since then I’ve had the opportunity to work within the United States and Europe.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?

I’ve always had an interest in plant medicine with a focus on hemp and cannabis. My early years were spent in Jamaica and one of my great uncles who was a Rastafarian grew cannabis at home. It’s always been a part of my life in a very intimate way. He taught my mother how to make tinctures and other cannabis-based goods to aid with various ailments.

Cannabis helped me during back-to-back battles with Hodgkins Lymphoma, and a stem cell transplant. It helped to provide pain relief and aided with my appetite.

Hemp and cannabis have so much to offer the world; I see them as a medium for self-expression, creativity, love, exploration, and more. In addition to medicinal and adult-use benefits there are additional applications for the plants. I’m excited to see where research and innovation take us.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

I believe the myth of cannabis being more accessible to Black people is something we have to be mindful of sharing. There is still a great deal of disparity when it comes to ownership and hiring at all levels. Also, being in the industry on the plant-touching side is wildly expensive and filled with red tape; something rarely discussed.

However, I feel Black people and others impacted by the War on Drugs should have resources to aid entry and sustainability in the cannabis industry. This means fair access to loans, grants, banking, record expungement, and more.

What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

Though many have been hopeful, cannabis equity programs on the state level have not been successful. There are still too many barriers for operators of color and the formerly incarcerated; especially those who are Black and Latine.

From what I’ve seen industry and community-based cannabis equity efforts are doing what adult-use states attempted to do but on a much smaller scale. Via heading the leadership team at Cannabis for Black Lives our members and team have been able to aid in fundraising for, and amplifying organizations including Supernova Women, The Hood Incubator, Our Academy, Equitable Opportunities Now, and more. Those cannabis equity-centered organizations are committed to giving their communities––impacted by the War on Drugs––the tools necessary to build and sustain businesses, and to advocate for themselves and others.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

In 2022 one of my goals includes creating more space for disabled, BIPOC, and queer people outside of the often lazy DEI framework used in cannabis. We focus so much on the black and white that we miss many things in between as well as in the margins. Cannabis should be a more welcoming industry due to the role many marginalized people have played in its past, present, and soon, the future.

In addition to what’s already been stated, I want to turn more eyes towards innovation in multiple parts of the industry. However, I want these conversations to be accessible to all, including those new to cannabis and plant medicine.


StaffFebruary 8, 2022
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8min7460

This is being republished from Crain Chicago and was written by Jon Asplund.

Psychedelics are going legitimate, looking to trade a reputation as illicit, illegal party drugs for legal, approved treatments for medical problems like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

At the vanguard is ketamine. Patients are piling into a host of ketamine clinics, including Toronto-based Field Trip Health (OTC: FTRP) and Chicago-based Wesana Health. The drug is taking its place alongside marijuana as once-illegal markets that are now growing industries. Other psychedelics and psychoactive compounds are waiting in the wings.

Wesana was co-founded by former Chicago Blackhawk Daniel Carcillo, who turned to psychedelics for relief after retiring from hockey at age 30 with concussion-related traumatic brain injury. Wesana went public on the Canadian Stock Exchange in May 2021, with headquarters in both Toronto and Chicago.

Field Trip was founded in April 2019, went public on the Canadian Securities Exchange in October 2020, and began Nasdaq trading in July 2021. It has between 100 and 200 employees and operates clinics in eight U.S. cities, as well as three cities in Canada and in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement.

Carcillo has drawn attention for use of traditional psychedelics, such as psilocybin, commonly known as magic mushrooms, but the biggest piece of business today is ketamine.

Ketamine has been used illegally for its hallucinogenic high and has been long approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as an intravenous anesthetic.

In 2019, the FDA approved Janssen Pharmaceuticals’ ketamine analog, esketamine. A nasal spray, under the brand name Spravato, esketamine is tightly regulated by the FDA to require a specific strategy, used on patients with treatment-resistant depression, with little room for variation, said Dr. John Zajecka, a Rush University professor of psychiatry and director of the Woman’s Board Depression Treatment Research Center.

Zajecka said the off-label, intravenous use of ketamine in clinics preceded the FDA-approved nasal spray.

The prospects for psychedelic therapies, from ketamine to psilocybin to MDMA, the drug known as molly, drew Florida attorney and certified public accountant Dustin Robinson to investing in the cannabis industry. As co-founder of Iter Investments, with 15 companies in its portfolio, Robinson said he was struck by the psychedelic space’s reliance on science, including the prospect of FDA approval.

Psychedelics “will grow by being available throughout the country and around the world, not through a patchwork of state laws like with marijuana.”

In the meantime, for Wesana Health, ketamine is something of a means to an end. Wesana’s two area clinics, in Oak Brook and downtown Chicago, saw dramatic growth since being purchased in September. The clinics logged a 40% increase in new patients and a 29% increase in new appointments between the third and fourth quarters of 2021, the company said in a statement.

It has also announced plans to open a 3,100-square-foot clinic in Naperville in the coming months. The clinic will offer ketamine infusions; the nasal-spray form of ketamine, Spravato; plus insurance-reimbursable services, such as general psychiatric care, individual psychotherapy, neurocognitive testing and addiction medicine, the company said in a statement.

“These are not ketamine mills,” Carcillo said. “We do things correctly. I don’t even like to be called a psychedelic company.”

At Field Trip Health’s Chicago location in River North, patients see a nurse practitioner and therapist, go through one or two prep sessions before ketamine sessions and see therapists afterward to help sustain positive behavior changes realized by the ketamine trip, said Matt Emmer, vice president of health care practice at Field Trip Health.

“You can have illuminating sessions (with ketamine), but it is the therapy that helps create sustainable change,” he says.

Field Trip Chicago, open for almost a year, has provided “several hundred sessions” to patients who have treatment-resistant depression, severe anxiety and often post-traumatic stress disorder, says Anya Ravitz, a Field Trip psychotherapist.

“In the middle of a pandemic, with the general state of the world, trauma is just more attenuated. I’ve seen ketamine therapy be so helpful for almost all our clients. It moves people past that place of ‘stuckness’ and takes them beyond an ordinary state of consciousness. Talk therapy can take you there, too, but it takes a long time,” she said.

Field Trip’s treatment is the ketamine-through-intramuscular-injection route. The company said in a statement that its doses are “significantly lower than what has been safely used in anesthesia for decades.”

Zajecka said that, like the Spravato model, “what’s going to have to happen with these other treatments is there’s going to need to be guidance of what will be the standards of care. We need to stay focused on where the empirical evidence takes us.”

Nevertheless, ketamine therapies—specifically, Spravato—have been “kind of groundbreaking, Zajecka said, and research into all these different compounds “has opened the door to many possibilities.”

At Rush, Zajecka’s research is moving toward a study of Spravato being used in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy. He said he also plans to be involved in psilocybin studies in which the drug is used in a systematic way that involves clinicians monitoring the patient’s experiences and talking through the experience afterward.

Beyond ketamine, Wesana is in the early phases of seeking FDA approval of its combination psilocybin and cannabidiol therapy drug candidate, SANA-013. The company will have a pre-Investigational New Drug meeting with the FDA on March 11 to discuss the proprietary protocol of SANA-013 for the treatment of traumatic brain injury-related major depressive disorder.

Field Trip Health is developing psychedelic therapies, beginning with a psychedelic molecule, FT-104, informally known as Isoprocin Glutarate.

“We designed FT-104 to provide a more convenient, practical and consistent experience, while retaining the characteristics of a classical serotonin psychedelic,” Joseph del Moral, Field Trip Health CEO, said in a statement. “These aspects are important therapeutic and commercial differentiators which may truly separate FT-104 from psilocybin for clinical operators and for patients seeking psychedelic psychotherapy.”


StaffFebruary 7, 2022
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8min10520

Jushi Holdings Inc.

Latoya Bellamy-Lockhart, Vice President of Human Resources of Jushi Holdings Inc. (OTC: JUSHF)

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

I’ve been around cannabis most of my life, though I formally entered the industry in December of 2020. While I was at my last job, working as the Human Resources Director at Brightline Trains, I was contacted by a recruiter who thought I would be a great fit for a role in Jushi’s Human Resources department. After meeting with Nichole Upshaw, Jushi’s head of HR, and others, I took a hard look at the company’s values, trajectory, and the overall cannabis landscape, and everything just seemed to click. I accepted the offer to become Jushi’s Sr. Director, Talented Acquisition & Employee Experience. Making the leap into cannabis ended up being fairly easy because the whole thing felt natural. Right away, it became clear that my perspectives and the professional skills I had previously developed would not only add value to the company but could also make a real difference in people’s lives.

One year later, I am Jushi’s Vice President of Human Resources, where I am charged with overseeing the company’s areas of talent acquisition, employee relations, and employee experience. I couldn’t be happier to be a part of this incredibly important movement in America’s history.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry? 3 reasons.

While there were numerous reasons, the most important factor for me was the opportunity to work in an environment focused on improving the quality of life for so many people. Cannabis allows millions of people to manage a wide variety of difficult and debilitating conditions, and this impact can’t be overlooked. Secondly, I have witnessed the horrible consequences of the failed war on drugs, both within my own community and throughout our country as a whole. The opportunity to drive key changes in how society perceives and handles cannabis is something I am immensely proud of and do not take lightly. Lastly, I wanted to work with compassionate, innovative people who stand for something I believe in. At Jushi, I’m so grateful to work with such wonderful and talented people. Together we have built a team that is not only committed to doing right by our patients, customers, and communities but also committed to uplifting each other and bettering the cannabis industry as a whole. As a result, we’ve become one of the strongest cannabis companies in the space.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

I think there are sizable opportunities for Black Americans both in and out of the cannabis sector that has largely been untapped and unrealized due to our country’s legacy of systematic racism and disenfranchisement. Specifically talking about the cannabis sector, I believe there are a wide variety of opportunities for Black Americans; we are in a unique position, as so many of us have firsthand knowledge of and experience with the plant, we have been disproportionately incarcerated and affected by the war on drugs, and we hold a deep understanding of the history and culture surrounding plant and how it’s led to where the industry is at today. Our knowledge is a real asset.

Both the private and public sectors have more work to do in terms of promoting equality, diversity, and inclusion. Of the utmost importance: I look forward to seeing more Black Americans’ records expunged so that they have the opportunity to benefit from and be a part of what is now a multi-billion dollar industry. While there is a ton more work to do, we are making progress, and we won’t stop fighting for equality and overturning failed policies of the past that continue to plague Black communities and bar Black Americans’ ability to be successful in this industry.

What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

My personal favorite is the Center for Constitutional Rights (“CCR”), an organization dedicated to advancing and protecting rights guaranteed by both the U.S. Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Through its combined application of cutting-edge litigation, education, advocacy, and strategic communications efforts, the CCR is able to address a broad range of civil and human rights issues. This work is vital given our current social climate where the rights of so many are infringed upon and egregious inequality still exists.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

As a woman and a Black American in the workforce, I’m acutely aware the odds have been stacked against me. I have the tendency to place too much pressure on myself – I’m sure many Black women can relate. At times, I know that pressure has caused me to unnecessarily second-guess myself. In 2022, some of my personal goals are to cut myself a break, focus more on self-care and continue working to trust myself. I plan to put myself out there more and be an example to show Black Americans what’s possible. I also plan on taking on more mentees in the space who I can show the ropes too. I’ve been lucky to have some great mentors over the years and I’m determined to pay it forward; I encourage others in leadership roles to do the same. Mentoring – through both big and small actions –  can make all the difference in someone’s life and career.


StaffFebruary 4, 2022
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4min8770

LeafLink

Dennis Williams / Director of Content and Brand

Dennis Williams is the Director of Content & Brand at LeafLink. He’s focused on leading content strategy to support the decision makers in cannabis of today and tomorrow. He works alongside our business lines at LeafLink, our clients, and our partners to continue growing our community of brands, retailers, and operators. Dennis is a former two-time Linkedin Top Voice and has a track record in crafting digital content to drive strategic growth in B2B industries.

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

I formally entered the cannabis space in the summer of 2021.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?

I believe everyone in this industry is an advocate for the redefinition of cannabis just by the nature of our work. The opportunity to have that impact through technology is what continues to excite me each and every day.

As the cannabis industry continues to develop, so many more sectors of jobs will begin to emerge, and I’m passionate about being a part of this change.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

The opportunity for black men and women in cannabis is growing but there is still work to be done to create space for representation across each division of the cannabis industry.

Legal cannabis is scaling quickly across the nation, and I’m excited to see how black men and women can assume new roles of leadership.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

My personal goal is to offer a platform to as many minority cannabis business founders and social equity license owners as I possibly can. There’s a lack of enablement for smaller entities and minority owners, and this constantly developing industry doesn’t leave many historical experiences to help navigate and forecast for what’s to come.

As a technology-first wholesale cannabis organization member, I’m in a position to elevate the voices of the industry that are doing positive and meaningful work. Having this level of impact through the elevation of others is where I truly see myself making a difference.


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The Green Market Report focuses on the financial news of the rapidly growing cannabis industry. Our target approach filters out the daily noise and does a deep dive into the financial, business and economic side of the cannabis industry. Our team is cultivating the industry’s critical news into one source and providing open source insights and data analysis


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