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AvatarHeather AllmanMarch 7, 2020
ctyp_news_syntheticmarijuana_web2_RobDobi-150x150-1.jpg

19min1140
Some are spinning, some are confused and some should know better. Yes, Florida’s medical cannabis environment is like being in the Matrix but that doesn’t mean there’s an excuse for lazy research and opinion writing that lessens the chance of disabling the Sentinels.
If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with following accreditation
AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT

A wise publisher once advised me that the marijuana business news reporting was “normally lightweight but generally not incorrect. It’s the ‘financial press’ who normally write the most [mess]. Usually because they are spinning.” —or blissfully ignorant, in my opinion.

In The Motley Fool article we are discussing today, indeed both schools of cannabis press have exhibited the poor practice of misreporting in this example from Feb 28, 2020: The Motley Fool Article: Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate

To begin, I think we can all agree that 28 weeks is quite a long time. If you’re bad at math, like I am, that equals seven long months. That’s a lifetime in today’s evolving, fast-paced cannabis news cycle. Especially when Florida is involved. 

Seven months spans all the way from last summer 2019— immediately following the passage of the smokable delivery method of whole flower in spring 2019— all the way up to our current Florida winter 2020. And let me tell you, Florida’s medical cannabis has grown exponentially in that time.

The Motley Fool logo and URL address | March 2, 2020

Screenshot of The Motley Fool logo and URL address | March 2, 2020

The name says it all: The Motley Fool.

Who knew the title was quite literal in this instance, not just a figure of speech? After their Feb 28, 2020 report by Eric Volkman titled Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate, I know it’s oftentimes literal, and soon you’ll know too.¹

The title alone is correct, but misleading. An amendment style to cap THC limits in the Florida medical marijuana program was indeed filed.²

However, this 10% THC cap would only apply to patients younger than 21 years of age. This cap would not affect all products and therefore would not affect all patients in the program.³

Immediately following this click-bait title, he quotes outdated, incorrect Florida medical cannabis statistics.

Even more troubling is that his source is the nationwide advocacy and activist organization Marijuana Policy Project.⁴

I know firsthand that these identical statistics have been posted since summer 2019, or seven months ago!

So with this one article, here we are 28 weeks later, reading the wrong information:

“Florida’s medical marijuana program could become more restrictive if the state’s legislature approves an amendment to a healthcare bill currently being considered. On Friday, state Sen. Gayle Harrell, a Republican, filed an amendment capping the concentration of THC in legal cannabis to 10% for patients under the age of 21, unless they suffer from a terminal illness.²

“Harrell is not the only state politician eager to cap THC content in products for sale to certain patients. Other Republicans in both the state’s Senate and its House of Representatives have expressed similar ambitions.

“At the moment, Florida law allows for full-potency THC in cannabis. With the increasing sophistication of growth technology, however, some cultivators have developed powerful, THC-rich strains of the plant. Most marijuana contains an average of roughly 25% of THC, although that percentage can be significantly higher in certain varieties.”¹

There is more to the article after you hit the “Read More” button; however, you have to put in your email address and sign up for The Motley Fool newsletter in order to read the rest of the article. No thank you.

Let’s dissect the portion of the article available to the public that we read above. There are several areas with mistakes, namely three, which I will highlight below.

ERROR #1

“However, since Florida is a populous state that has a great many senior citizens, there is a relatively large customer base for medical marijuana. According to advocacy group Marijuana Policy Project, as of last July there were just over 240,000 patients registered in the state’s medical cannabis program.” ¹,⁴

As of February 28, 2020 when this article was published, Florida had a total patient count of a whopping 321,144 registrants.⁷ It should be noted that we only have 2,591 registered cannabis physicians for all of those patients throughout the state. 

I double-checked the Marijuana Policy Project⁴ website on March 6 and the numbers that they gave are horrendously outdated, from July 2019, a long 28 weeks ago:

  • Florida 2018 State Population: 21,299,325
  • Patient Numbers: 240,070 
  • Current Through: 7/5/19
  • Percent of Population That Are Patients: 1.13%

 

What are the correct numbers⁷ 28 weeks later on February 28, 2020?

  • Florida 2018 State Population: +21,480,000
  • Patient Numbers: 321,144   
  • Current Through: 2/28/20
  • Percent of Population That Are Patients: 1.5%

 

ERROR #2

“A key marijuana company catering to this market is dispensary operator Trulieve Cannabis (OTC:TCNNF). Trulieve has 35 stores throughout the state.”¹

Again, it pays to do your homework. In actuality, the February 28, 2020 OMMU Weekly Update⁷ reports that Trulieve’s physical footprint in Florida has grown to 45 stores.⁷ That’s ten more than reported here. 

The largest operator in the state, Trulieve has dispensed 48 million milligrams of medical cannabis solely within the February 21 to February 27 time frame.⁷

For comparison, the closest medical cannabis competitor Surterra has only 39 stores and dispensed almost 9 million milligrams, a fifth of Trulieve’s business.⁷

ERROR #3

“The company hasn’t yet weighed in on the latest legislative developments in Florida. On Friday, Trulieve’s stock closed up by over 3%.”¹

This is categorically untrue. Not only do many dispensaries have full-page announcements about the THC cap on their main online lending page, but also Trulieve goes a step further and includes a call to action where you can look up your legislator and send a form letter in opposition.⁶

Trulieve main website landing page, March 6, 2020

Trulieve main website landing page, March 6, 2020

In addition, as a patient, I received the following two emails from trulieve asking me to take action to prevent the THC cap from being made into a law:

“”As announced on February 13th, Florida lawmakers are pushing a new law that will force medical marijuana companies to grow low-grade plants with low concentrations of THC and will put a general limit on THC in most forms of medication.

This bad law will force medical marijuana patients to buy more, smoke more, and vape more in order to receive the same dosage recommended by their physician.

Thousands of medical marijuana patients are joining the call to stop this because they know forcing patients to pay more for medical marijuana is not just wrong, it is a mean-spirited attack on patients.

HELP STOP THIS BAD IDEA FROM BECOMING LAW.”

“By now you have seen the news: Florida lawmakers want to force medical marijuana patients to smoke more, vape more, and pay more for medical marijuana just to get the same dose.

This will raise the cost for already sick patients.

This new law will force medical marijuana companies to grow low-grade plants with low concentrations of THC as well as enforce a general THC limit in all forms of medication patients have come to rely on.

This will then require medical marijuana patients to buy more, smoke more, and vape more in order to achieve the same dosage recommended by their physician.

Thousands of medical marijuana patients are joining the call to stop this because they understand that forcing patients to pay more for medical marijuana is not just wrong, it is a mean-spirited attack on patients.

HELP STOP THIS BAD IDEA FROM BECOMING LAW.

Call Today: Click here to find a Lawmaker“⁶

I would say that this constitutes a company paying attention and weighing in quite loudly. Unlike Volkman’s article that claims that “The company hasn’t yet weighed in on the latest legislative developments in Florida.”¹

Perhaps they have not sent out a public press release as of the writing of this article but that does not excuse sloppy journalism. In this case, outdated statistics and alarmist language implemented by The Motley Fool and Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) respectively.

While The Fool may not know any better, the MPP is a huge national organization that patients, clinicians, advocates, and activists rely on. They should keep more up-to-date figures for reference, in my opinion, so reporters and readers alike can know the exact patient number count as of the current date.

REFERENCES 

¹The Motley Fool Article: Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate

²SB 230 Announcement: Sen. Gayle Harrell slips 10% THC cap on medical marijuana into health care bill

³Florida Senate Bill: /CS/CS/SB 230: Department of Health

⁴Marijuana Policy Project Patient Numbers by State: Medical Marijuana Patient Numbers

⁵Trulieve Asks Patients For Help: Trulieve Call to Action Against THC Cap

⁶Trulieve Public Announcement: https://www.trulieve.com/, Retrieved 3/6/2020

⁷Florida OMMU Weekly Updates

[Disclaimer: Eric Volkman has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned.]

 


AvatarHeather AllmanMarch 7, 2020
Florida-scaled.jpg

16min2672
Some are spinning, some are confused and some should know better. Yes, Florida’s medical cannabis environment is like being in the Matrix but that doesn’t mean there’s an excuse for lazy research and opinion writing that lessens the chance of disabling the Sentinels.
If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with following accreditation
AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT

A wise publisher once advised me that the marijuana business news reporting was “normally lightweight but generally not incorrect. It’s the ‘financial press’ who normally write the most [mess]. Usually, because they are spinning.” —or blissfully ignorant, in my opinion.

In The Motley Fool article, we are discussing today, indeed both schools of cannabis press have exhibited the poor practice of misreporting in this example from Feb 28, 2020: The Motley Fool Article: Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate

To begin with, I think we can all agree that 28 weeks is quite a long time. If you’re bad at math, like I am, that equals seven long months. That’s a lifetime in today’s evolving, fast-paced cannabis news cycle. Especially when Florida is involved.

Seven months spans all the way from last summer 2019— immediately following the passage of the smokable delivery method of the whole flower in spring 2019— all the way up to our current Florida winter 2020. And let me tell you, Florida’s medical cannabis has grown exponentially in that time.

The Motley Fool logo and URL address | March 2, 2020

Screenshot of The Motley Fool logo and URL address | March 2, 2020

The name says it all: The Motley Fool.

Who knew the title was quite literal in this instance, not just a figure of speech? After their Feb 28, 2020 report by Eric Volkman titled Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate, I know it’s oftentimes literal, and soon you’ll know too.¹

The title alone is correct but misleading. An amendment style to cap THC limits in the Florida medical marijuana program was indeed filed.²

However, this 10% THC cap would only apply to patients younger than 21 years of age. This cap would not affect all products and therefore would not affect all patients in the program.³

Immediately following this click-bait title, he quotes outdated, incorrect Florida medical cannabis statistics.

Even more troubling is that his source is the national advocacy and activist organization Marijuana Policy Project.⁴

I know firsthand that these identical statistics have been posted since summer 2019, or seven months ago!

So with this one article, here we are 28 weeks later, reading the wrong information:

“Florida’s medical marijuana program could become more restrictive if the state’s legislature approves an amendment to a healthcare bill currently being considered. On Friday, state Sen. Gayle Harrell, a Republican, filed an amendment capping the concentration of THC in legal cannabis to 10% for patients under the age of 21, unless they suffer from a terminal illness.²

“Harrell is not the only state politician eager to cap THC content in products for sale to certain patients. Other Republicans in both the state’s Senate and its House of Representatives have expressed similar ambitions.

“At the moment, Florida law allows for full-potency THC in cannabis. With the increasing sophistication of growth technology, however, some cultivators have developed powerful, THC-rich strains of the plant. Most marijuana contains an average of roughly 25% of THC, although that percentage can be significantly higher in certain varieties.”¹

There is more to the article after you hit the “Read More” button; however, you have to put in your email address and sign up for The Motley Fool newsletter in order to read the rest of the article. No thank you.

Let’s dissect the portion of the article available to the public that we read above. There are several areas with mistakes, namely three, which I will highlight below.

ERROR #1

“However, since Florida is a populous state that has a great many senior citizens, there is a relatively large customer base for medical marijuana. According to advocacy group Marijuana Policy Project, as of last July there were just over 240,000 patients registered in the state’s medical cannabis program.” ¹,⁴

As of February 28, 2020, when this article was published, Florida had a total patient count of a whopping 321,144 registrants.⁷ It should be noted that we only have 2,591 registered cannabis physicians for all of those patients throughout the state.

I double-checked the Marijuana Policy Project⁴ website on March 6 and the numbers that they gave are horrendously outdated, from July 2019, a long 28 weeks ago:

  • Florida 2018 State Population: 21,299,325
  • Patient Numbers: 240,070 
  • Current Through: 7/5/19
  • Percent of Population That Are Patients: 1.13%

 

What are the correct numbers⁷ 28 weeks later on February 28, 2020?

  • Florida 2018 State Population: +21,480,000
  • Patient Numbers: 321,144⁷   
  • Current Through: 2/28/20⁷
  • Percent of Population That Are Patients: 1.5%

 

ERROR #2

“A key marijuana company catering to this market is dispensary operator Trulieve Cannabis (OTC:TCNNF). Trulieve has 35 stores throughout the state.”¹

Again, it pays to do your homework. In actuality, the February 28, 2020 OMMU Weekly Update⁷ reports that Trulieve’s physical footprint in Florida has grown to 45 stores.⁷ That’s ten more than reported here.

The largest operator in the state, Trulieve has dispensed 48 million milligrams of medical cannabis solely within the February 21 to February 27 time frame.⁷

For comparison, the closest medical cannabis competitor Surterra has only 39 stores and dispensed almost 9 million milligrams, a fifth of Trulieve’s business.⁷

ERROR #3

“The company hasn’t yet weighed in on the latest legislative developments in Florida. On Friday, Trulieve’s stock closed up by over 3%.”¹

This is categorically untrue. Not only do many dispensaries have full-page announcements about the THC cap on their main online lending page, but also Trulieve goes a step further and includes a call to action where you can look up your legislator and send a form letter in opposition.⁶

Trulieve main website landing page, March 6, 2020

Trulieve main website landing page, March 6, 2020

In addition, as a patient, I received the following two emails from trulieve asking me to take action to prevent the THC cap from being made into a law:

“”As announced on February 13th, Florida lawmakers are pushing a new law that will force medical marijuana companies to grow low-grade plants with low concentrations of THC and will put a general limit on THC in most forms of medication.

This bad law will force medical marijuana patients to buy more, smoke more, and vape more in order to receive the same dosage recommended by their physician.

Thousands of medical marijuana patients are joining the call to stop this because they know forcing patients to pay more for medical marijuana is not just wrong, it is a mean-spirited attack on patients.

HELP STOP THIS BAD IDEA FROM BECOMING LAW.”

“By now you have seen the news: Florida lawmakers want to force medical marijuana patients to smoke more, vape more, and pay more for medical marijuana just to get the same dose.

This will raise the cost for already sick patients.

This new law will force medical marijuana companies to grow low-grade plants with low concentrations of THC as well as enforce a general THC limit in all forms of medication patients have come to rely on.

This will then require medical marijuana patients to buy more, smoke more, and vape more in order to achieve the same dosage recommended by their physician.

Thousands of medical marijuana patients are joining the call to stop this because they understand that forcing patients to pay more for medical marijuana is not just wrong, it is a mean-spirited attack on patients.

HELP STOP THIS BAD IDEA FROM BECOMING LAW.

Call Today: Click here to find a Lawmaker“⁶

I would say that this constitutes a company paying attention and weighing in quite loudly. Unlike Volkman’s article that claims that “The company hasn’t yet weighed in on the latest legislative developments in Florida.”¹

Perhaps they have not sent out a public press release as of the writing of this article but that does not excuse sloppy journalism. In this case, outdated statistics and alarmist language implemented by The Motley Fool and Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) respectively.

While The Fool may not know any better, the MPP is a huge national organization that patients, clinicians, advocates, and activists rely on. They should keep more up-to-date figures for reference, in my opinion, so reporters and readers alike can know the exact patient number count as of the current date.

REFERENCES 

¹The Motley Fool Article: Marijuana THC Cap Amendment Filed in Florida Senate

²SB 230 Announcement: Sen. Gayle Harrell slips 10% THC cap on medical marijuana into health care bill

³Florida Senate Bill: /CS/CS/SB 230: Department of Health

⁴Marijuana Policy Project Patient Numbers by State: Medical Marijuana Patient Numbers

⁵Trulieve Asks Patients For Help: Trulieve Call to Action Against THC Cap

⁶Trulieve Public Announcement: https://www.trulieve.com/, Retrieved 3/6/2020

⁷Florida OMMU Weekly Updates

[Disclaimer: Eric Volkman has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned.]

 


AvatarHeather AllmanMarch 7, 2020
aphria-s-17-000-plants.jpg

22min2910
If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with following accreditation
AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT
Cartridges, Batteries and Waste, Oh My! — Part 2
  • What about sustainability in the U.S. cannabis industry in 2018?

The scary question as discussed directly in Ryan Miller’s June 2018 article on Recycling in the Cannabis Industry: Nipping a cannabis garbage problem in the bud.

Eaze’s 2017 State of Cannabis report claims:

According to BDS analytics, in April of 2018, $52.3MM in vape products were sold in California, representing 25% of overall cannabis market sales.[i] While it’s hard to break that dollar figure down into actual units (especially since it contains cartridges, batteries, and all-in-one units) lets estimate that represents over 1 million items purchased that need to get disposed of.[ii]

“The material in them, with the exception of the actual part holding cannabis, is completely recyclable or reusable. The body is made of recyclable plastic, the battery inside can find life in another product, and the electronics can be reused in another device.

“Many of these same folks have a box of used cartridges in their home, since they have no idea what to do with them. And this isn’t for lack of want — in fact in 2017 some forward thinking dispensaries had collection boxes for these products, although without scale they wound up just hoarding them as well.

“Since this issue is particular relevant to us and our customers, we knew we have to take the initiative. We did some research and discovered that leaders in the e-cigarette industry have already established expansive recycling initiatives for used e-cigarette cartridges and lithium batteries, so the infrastructure is already there. But it has to be done at scale. The only way to achieve this scale is to use dispensaries as the collection points, much like some were already doing back in 2017.”

Obviously, modifications to these regulations were proposed:

  1. A modification of the California Code of Regulations, Title 16, Division 42 (MAUCURSA), Section 5410, to allow customers to return cannabis contaminated hardware products (such as vapes) to any licensed retailer. If dispensary elects to participate they have to let the state know and provide a locked box collection point that can be inspected at any time. It can simply be added to the track and trace with a general count (inspection should require count is within 20% of total items in box). Locked box would be provided by a distributor or manufacturer.

SOURCE 》 [v] CA Code of Regulations, Title 16, Division 42, Section 5055(e) http://bcc.ca.gov/law_regs/readopt_text_final.pdf

Joe Kukura on November 1, 2018 answers “Currently no, but some vape and oil manufacturers hope to make the sector significantly greener.”

“The dirty little secret of cannabis vaping is that cartridges and vape pens generally cannot be recycled, so they pile up in landfills. Even though most components are made of recycled materials, their condition after use leaves them ineligible to be handled by standard curbside services.

“Industry recycling advocates have been stymied by the very regulations that were intended to keep cannabis safe and sustainable.”

  • Are there any recyclable e-cigarettes or vapes out there?

Kukura continues with the solutions:

“Companies like TerraCycle provide Zero Waste Boxes for people to take matters into their own hands and recycle e-cigarettes at their home or office. TerraCycle collects discarded e-cigarettes using purchasable waste boxes, ranging from $47 for an individual pouch to $1,640 for a much larger pallet, typically used by several people over time. The user, or users then ship the disposed e-cigarettes to the company, and the collected waste is mechanically or manually separated into metals and plastics and later melted to be recycled. 

“Refilling is also easier than most people think: most pens with refillable tanks have a filler hole, which you can transfer additional oil into using a dropper. There are several varieties on the market, from the Cora Vaporizer, which features a magnetically attached refillable tank, to the Vaporite Amber L, which also has a refillable tank with customizable coil options. Best of all, these pens mean fewer trips to the dispensary for you, and fewer vape cartridges going into the landfill.”

  • Is there anything being done to combat the waste issue?

The Sunset Bill in Colorado would accomplish a step towards cannabis recycling.

Meanwhile back in Florida, we have trash cans.

Trashcan filled with product bags directly outside the door at Trulieve dispensary, Pensacola, Florida on N. Davis Highway

Trash can filled with product bags directly outside the door at Trulieve dispensary, Pensacola, Florida on N. Davis Highway

  • What else can I do in the meantime?

Having sustainability in mind when choosing your cannabis products is the most immediate step users can take to combat the issue. If you’re a user with the option and money to choose one more sustainable cannabis product over another brand, then absolutely make that greener choice when you can.

If you haven’t done so yet, as an intelligent, suave cannabis purchaser and consumer, please consider switching to a more eco-friendly delivery method than vaping. Think about the simple fact that if nothing else, flower can be composted. Homemade and unpackaged personal edibles disappear upon ingestion and liver first-pass— that is when and if edibles become available for sale later this spring in Florida.

Our Florida OMMU recently announced that edibles would be available as soon as March 16 2020. We’ll see what actually transpires on this front and I’ll keep you posted.

  • What about sustainability in the U.S. cannabis industry has changed between 2017-2020?

Not much has changed, that’s for sure. Cannabis Dispensary’s October 2019 Vape Recycling Has Become a Challenge for the Cannabis Industry asks the big question:

Wondering how to navigate vape-related recycling? You’re not alone. Even in this environmentally conscious industry, helping customers recycle vape cartridges, batteries and disposables isn’t as easy as it could be. But don’t despair. A look into recycling options and realities can help your dispensary become part of the recycling solution.”

Firstly, Dosist’s unique “dose pens” are designed differently than strain-based vape pens in that “as many of the components as possible can be fully recycled, reused or repurposed,” according to its website.

Secondly, the company also offers a rewards-based recycling program in conjunction with Gaiaca, encouraging customers to return a used dose pen for a $5 discount on their next pen.

*This program can not be offered to consumers in Florida.

  • What Types of Vape Recycling Programs Has the Industry Seen?

In the past, there have been multiple sustainability and recycling programs at work in the cannabis industry, such as paid returns for empties, pickup, hazardous waste roundups, in-store disposal mailing envelopes, reward programs, and other incentives.

The most common, albeit infeasible, approach has been simple collection boxes at local cannabis retailers. But little to no success or progress has been made for mandatory state-sanctioned cannabis collection or recycling participation.

EXTRA: How (and Where) to Recycle Cannabis Containers & Old Vape Pens

  • Let the Community Cannabis Collection, or C³, start today.

Vape Recycling–8 Steps For You:

  1. Know your state regulations
  2. Talk with vape vendors
  3. Know your product lines
  4. Educate your staff
  5. Reach out to recycling and hazardous waste agencies
  6. Help consumers and recyclers connect
  7. Educate and encourage customers
  8. Get involved

Each state has its own recycling regulations, so if you are a cannabis consumer, it would be helpful to know (a) what your state provides for cannabis end user recycling and (b) what it requires of legal medical cannabis companies and statewide dispensaries, if anything, as far as recycling-renewable compliance.

As for Florida, the state does not provide for any type of cannabis container collection, recycling, or renewability in its medical cannabis program’s regulatory framework.

And as an end-user of legal medical cannabis in this state, I can attest to the fact that there is absolutely NO availability of recycling for vape cartridges, used empty containers, packaging, or batteries in most U.S. states.

NO collection boxes for me

+ NO recycling compliance framework requirement for cannabis companies or for local dispensaries

+ NO action at the state or corporate levels

= NO action by individual cannabis consumers.

This sad, massive cannabis waste problem must change, sooner rather than later.

For further cannabis sustainability reading:

  1. Cannabis Blogroll》published by me in Cannabis Law Report.:
  2. Growing》 What Is ‘Clean Green Certified’ Cannabis?
  3. Lifestyle》 This Cannabis Subreddit Is Cleaning Up the Earth
  4. Lifestyle》 An old-school plan to fight plastic pollution gathers steam
  5. National》 Is a World Without Trash Possible?
  6. Industry》 5 Ways to Love Earth as Much as You Love Cannabis
  7. Industry》 DOWNLOAD》FREE Dispensary Marketing E-Book

For further cannabis sustainability Resources:

Recycling + Sustainability 

  1. National Association of Cannabis Businesses: National Standards
  2. GCP —  Responsible Cannabis Framework
  3. GCP — Responsible Framework Fact Sheet
  4. The Sustainability Times
  5. E-Waste
  6. Earth911
  7. Recycling laws MAP
  8. Recycling LOCATOR
  9. Call2Recycle
  10. The Opportunities of Solar Panel Recycling
  11. The Solar Panel’s Life After Death
  12. Energizer Holdings Inc. Sustainability Pledge
  13. How to Recycle Batteries
  14. Where to Recycle Batteries
  15. Battery Recycling of America: Battery Recycling Process
  16. EZ On The Earth: Small Battery Recycling
  17. Pre-filled Oil Vape Cartridges
  18. The problem with coffee pods — eco-friendly alternatives
  19. Hempcrete Hasn’t Been Fireproof…Until Now
  20. Florida- Escambia County Household Hazardous Waste
  21. An Old-School Plan to Fight Plastic Pollution Gathers Steam
  22. Is a World Without Trash Possible?
  23. Nike reveals Space Hippie — sustainable sneakers made from waste
  24. Modern Firniture Collection Byounghwi Jeon, founder of Studio Pesi, repurposes manufacturing waste
  25. Portugal designer João Leão created PET MINI — an electric skateboard made out of plastic waste
  26. Inhabitat— RECYCLED MATERIALS
  27. How to properly and safely dispose of 10 common items in your home, i.e. batteries
  28. SLIPPY – Reusable Drink Cozy
  29. Cannabis Companies Struggle To Become More Sustainable — January 2019
  30. Sustainability in Cannabis — January 2020
  31. The Cannabis Sustainability Inquiry: Could Marijuana And Hemp Offer The Solution To The World’s Toughest Environmental, Social, And Economic Problems? — August 2019
  32. The Environmental Downside of Cannabis Cultivation — June 2019
  33. Growing Cannabis With Sustainable Practices — January 2019
  34. Future Cannabis Industry Leaders Will Focus on Sustainability and Social Impact — February 2020

Sean HockingSean HockingMarch 7, 2020
scara2.jpg

5min3190

First up let’s give you the press release

Financial Firm Behind the World’s Largest Cannabis Fund to Partner with SALT on all Content in Emerging Vertical

NEW YORKMarch 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — SALT, a leading global thought leadership forum, announced that ETF Managers Group (ETFMG), the thought leader and issuer behind the world’s largest cannabis ETF, MJ, will take on a leading content production role at this year’s flagship Las Vegas event. The firm will be the exclusive sponsor and curator of the first ever cannabis track taking place on the afternoon of Wednesday, May 20.

The agenda will cover the business, banking, regulation, and innovation of cannabis, hemp, and CBD. At SALT Las Vegas last year, ETFMG led the “New Frontier of Cannabis Investing” panel on the Nuveen Stage, in addition to hosting two exclusive thought leadership events with their partner in education, Canopy Growth Corporation.

“We are proud to partner with one of the most forward-looking firms in the financial space,” said SALT founder Anthony Scaramucci. “As the cannabis business and the regulatory environment both mature, investors are looking for trusted information. Together with ETFMG, we aim to educate delegates about this complex and increasingly competitive market.”

In addition to managing the production of the cannabis stage during the conference, ETFMG will host a second annual invitation-only “Legends and Leaders” cocktail event at Bellagio. This will be complemented by a reprisal of its “Cannabis Innovator Breakfast” at Lago, this year’s topic and featured speaker(s) will be announced closer to the May event.

“We are excited to return to SALT with the opportunity to produce the first ever cannabis content track and interactive experience allowing delegates and media alike to immerse themselves in this global investment theme,” said ETFMG’s Chief Marketing Officer, Tricia Vanderslice. “The cannabis track will cross industries and borders unveiling a lineup of featured speakers that are paving the way in this rapidly evolving industry.”

Here’s his SALT bio which includes a rather understated line about his train disaster time at the White House

He served as the White House Communications Director for a period in July 2017.

Remember That Week !

 


AvatarHeather AllmanMarch 5, 2020
shutterstock_1459856213-scaled.jpg

31min3950
If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with the following accreditation
AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT

 

EDUCATION (noun) ed· u· ca· tion | ˌe-jə-ˈkā-shən — Definition of education (Merriam Webster – 2020)1a: the action or process of educating or of being educatedalso : a stage of such a processb: the knowledge and development resulting from the process of being educated

A screen shot shows the CannaMedU.com website, co-founded by Pamela Trapp, Heather Beuke Diers, and Amy Nichols. The trio records the Freshemp educational podcast which can be streamed on the site.

A screen shot shows the CannaMedU.com website, co-founded by Pamela Trapp, Heather Beuke Diers, and Amy Nichols. The trio records the Freshemp educational podcast which can be streamed on the site.

It all started last summer with an idea formed by Heather Diers and Pamela Trapp:

—HOW DO WE EDUCATE HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS  ABOUT MEDICAL CANNABIS?

It was a big idea and it definitely got some traction in Indiana, culminating in this Aug 29, 2019 column by Shari Rudavsky for the Indianapolis Star titled Weed 101: Three Indiana women want to teach doctors about medical cannabis:

Three Central Indiana women have launched a business to educate doctors and other health care providers on a topic about which many in the medical field know very little: cannabis.

Three Central Indiana women have launched a business to educate doctors and other health care providers on a topic about which many in the medical field know very little: cannabis.

“The interest behind CannaMedU began after personal experiences led the trio to try CBD oil for themselves or family members. They all sold the same brand and recommended it. 

Over time they developed expertise in its use and a desire to learn more about cannabis. Next came hosting gatherings for others interested in the topic.

From their own experiences and comments from people who attended their meetups, they knew that many doctors did not recommend CBD oil or cannabis in general to patients. Those who did could offer little guidance on how to take it.”

“We know more about cannabis medicine than many doctors do,” said Heather Diers, one of the co-founders of CannaMedU.”

Both Diers and Trapp are passionate, articulate, professional, and approachable when it comes to all things cannabis.

—WHAT IS OUR BACKGROUND?

  • Pam Trapp

PAMELA TRAPP

Pamela Trapp

Pam Trapp is inspired by all of the work that has been done in the cannabis industry and the patients whose lives has changed. As co-founder of Freshemp podcast and CannaMedU national education initiative, her mission has been to tell the world. Ellementa is the perfect partnership for her.

Freshemp Podcast | Pam Trapp

  • Heather Diers

Heather Diers

Heather Diers

Heather Diers is a co-founder of Canna MedU and Freshemp podcast, where we educate on all things cannabis and work hard to change the conversation about the most medicinal herb on earth. She is a certified Medical Cannabis Wellness Advisor and cannabis advocate and is also passionate about animals and pet nutrition. As a certified pet food nutrition specialist, she loves working with pet parents to help them customize a diet for their special needs pets (and humans!).

—HOW DO WE EDUCATE THE PROFESSIONALS THROUGH CANNAMEDU?

“Originally the group had planned to offer daylong continuing medical education courses for health care providers in Indiana and the neighboring states. Medical marijuana is legal in Ohio, and Illinois next year plans to join Michigan in legalizing it altogether.

For now, though, they will focus on providing in-house teaching for health care providers in their offices.”

One Indiana healthcare organization in took them up on their offer of medical cannabis education:

“The Indiana Health Group, which has more than 40 providers who offer behavioral health care, already has invited CannaMedU to speak with its staff.

A few years ago the group’s president, Dr. Chris Bojrab, started fielding more questions as well as personal testimonies about CBD oil from patients. He dove into the literature himself and last July began offering a CBD product for patients, and he invited the women of CannaMedU to make a presentation for his staff, impressed by how invested they seemed in the science behind cannabis.”

I don’t have a problem with them coming from outside mainstream medicine as long as everybody is playing by the same rules,” Bojrab said. “I really bristle when I hear people saying you can’t apply the rules of regular medicine to these kinds of products; you have to go with your gut. That’s not how we science.”

“Like many other doctors, Bojrab said, there was no discussion of cannabis as medicine when he attended medical school. Most medical schools today are just starting to consider whether and how to weave the topic into the curriculum.”

Although 33 states have now legalized medical cannabis, all right mainstream Western medicine has not reached agreement on where medical cannabis fits into the healthcare picture. It is agreed by all however that more research needs to be done.

“While CannaMedU is filling a niche by offering to educate doctors in person about cannabis, it’s not the only source of such information.”

For example, Green Flower offers online classes on cannabis, its medical benefits and even how to cook with cannabis. In the five years since the California company began, more than 220,000 people from 66 countries have undergone training, said Max Simon, chief executive officer and co-founder.

“Many of those have come from the health care industry because so many of their patients have been asking about cannabis, Simon reports. “There’s an intense desire to understand what’s happening in cannabis.”

—WHAT ABOUT CONTINUING THEIR PERSONAL CANNABIS EDUCATION?

In Pam Trapp’s insightful March 2, 2020 piece, I Am Still Learning About Cannabis, she illuminates the black hole of medical cannabis education and research:

“In the medical cannabis business, continuing education is perpetual. You don’t know what you don’t know. Educators, clinicians, formulators, farmers, extractors, the list goes on and on, must constantly continue, their education. Research in the US is now, thankfully and finally, ramping up. 

Education about this truly ancient, but heretofore suppressed, medicinal supplement is critical.” 

KEY POINTS:

  • Critical to clinicians and practitioners, most of whom aren’t even aware that humans have an endocannabinoid system. They have been woefully underserved by traditional medical education.
  • Critical to cannabis industry professionals. A generous description to some in the business.
  • Critical especially to consumers who are in desperate need of the plant for the litany of symptoms related to chronic conditions. 

“Its profound preventative properties are enough to make it desirable for those in perfect health. At the risk of sounding trite, as with most things in the cannabis industry, education is like the wild west.

Consumers are justifiably confused and are asking their doctors, most of whom are just as confused, and therefore, reluctant at best, to discuss the use of cannabinoid supplementation.

Dosing, chemovar specificity, terpene recommendations, product purity and potency, are all important issues to evaluate when it comes to use. This is why it is important for consumers to demand better.”

Trapp closes with a call to action: “Let’s rise to the challenge.”

Indeed.

—HOW ARE THEY EDUCATING THE PUBLIC? THROUGH THEIR FRESHEMP PODCAST:

Freshemp! Podcast

Freshemp! Podcast

‎Freshemp! Whats new. What’s hot. What’s health. What’s not.

“Diers and her colleagues believe that cannabis has a key role to play in a range of conditions. Diers —with Trapp hosts a monthly podcast, Freshemp — points to a complicated and little-understood part of the human body known as the endocannabinoid system.”

Freshemp podcasters and co-founders of CannaMedU are Pamela Trapp, left, Heather Beuke Diers, center, and Amy Nichols, right. (MICHELLE PEMBERTON/INDYSTAR)

Freshemp podcasters and co-founders of CannaMedU are Pamela Trapp, left, Heather Beuke Diers, center, and Amy Nichols, right. (MICHELLE PEMBERTON/INDYSTAR)⁵

EDUCATING THE PUBLIC THROUGH THEIR INDIANAPOLIS ELLEMENTA GROUP:

ELLEMENTA MEETING INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, JANUARY 16, 2020

ELLEMENTA MEETING INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA, JANUARY 16, 2020

ABOUT  ELLEMENTA:

As people begin to better understand that cannabis is a medicinal plant – and as more states legalize its use – many women are asking:

“Is cannabis right for me, for my loved ones, for my partner?”

Ellementa is a global wellness company educating women about plant medicine, including cannabis and CBD, and guiding them to quality products from trusted brands that want to reach them.

Ellementa is a global wellness company educating women about plant medicine, including cannabis and CBD, and guiding them to quality products from trusted brands that want to reach them.

We’re a women-owned company formed to connect women with trusted information, supportive community, and reliable resources focused on the health and wellness benefits of cannabis. We guide women on how to integrate cannabis legally, safely, and discreetly into their lives and introduce them to experts as well as brands with quality products and services to serve them.

We bring together diverse women with different levels of experience with cannabis – from the long-time consumer to the curious and exploring, from the medical user to the woman looking for a natural way to unwind at the end of the day. We connect women with trusted experts and brands so they can make educated decisions about the products and services they purchase on their cannabis journey.”

ELLEMENTA WOMAN

ELLEMENTA WOMAN

WHAT IS THE ELLEMENTA PHILOSOPHY?

“As women, we are often the caregivers of our families, our aging parents, even our ailing friends. We must also take care of ourselves so we can handle juggling the many aspects of our lives.

We are at the Epicenter of Care for our loved ones and ourselves.

We believe that women are the driving force to bring cannabis wellness to the mainstream. We aim to empower as many women as possible with quality information and supportive communities to enhance their exploration of cannabis for a healthier, happier life.

In this interactive conversation for women, we’ll help answer your questions such as:

— How does cannabis or CBD affect your body and brain?

— What does a wellness routine look like with plant medicine?

— What products out there are safe and reliable? And much, much more.

“Whether you are looking to learn more about addressing chronic or acute health conditions, Ellementa is here – along with our experts and community of women.”

—ELLEMENTA MEETING, INDIANAPOLIS- JAN 16, 2020

Pam Trapp, Fishers, Indiana (Left) and Heather Allman, Pensacola, Florida (Right)

Pam Trapp, Fishers, Indiana (Left) and Heather Allman, Pensacola, Florida (Right)

Above, six women meet at Coffee Co., Indianapolis, Indiana for the January 16, 2020 Ellementa Indiana gathering, titled”Your Best YOU for the New Year!” All from different backgrounds and knowledge based, but all curious about cannabis as a regimental therapeutic treatment.

It was an electric evening as women told their stories and asked their burning cannabis questions. Information was shared, insights gained, friendships blossomed. The Indiana “Green Wave” starts with small ripples such as this!

Ellementa Meeting, January 16,2020, Indianapolis, Indiana

Ellementa Meeting, January 16, 2020, Indianapolis, Indiana

I attended the event as a participant and reporter, and it was a good night for healthy cannabis conversation. Several women came from the community who needed to know more about dosing for their children. Intriguing dialogus was had between all parties. The time passed too quickly.

—ELLEMENTA INDIANA INFORMATION AND RESOURCES:

  1. Get Our Emails! Subscribe
  2. Meet Us Find a Local Gathering Near You
  3. Bring Ellementa to YOUR City!
  4. On Instagram
  5. On Twitter
  6. On Facebook

—REFERENCES:

¹Cannabis Certification:

https://www.cannamedu.com/cbd-cannabis-certification-courses

²Green-Flower Medical Cannabis CEO podcast,Green-Flower Academy Courses, Highlighted in Cannabis Tech

³https://cannabinoids.huji.ac.il/people/raphael-mechoulam

https://www.labroots.com/trending/cannabis-sciences/8456/endocannabinoid-system-discovered

IndyStar reporter Shari Rudavsky, 317-444-6354, shari.rudavsky@indystar.com


AvatarHeather AllmanMarch 3, 2020
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15min1940
If you wish to re-publish this story please do so with following accreditation
AUTHOR: Heather Allman
PUBLISHER:  CANNABIS LAW REPORT

In Indianapolis on January 29, a quiet, eager audience of nurses give their rapt attention to Jason Straw as he takes center stage at the 2020 ISNA Policy Conference. Straw is a retired USAF Critical Care Air Transport nurse who has served in combat.

Now, he is the Vice-Chair of Indiana NORML— an organization who is currently focused on changing cannabis laws for the access to Medical Cannabis as therapeutic treatment in Indiana.

ISNA 2020 POLICY CONFERENCE AGENDA, Jason Straw- Cannabis Policy

ISNA 2020 POLICY CONFERENCE AGENDA, Jason Straw- Cannabis Policy

MULTIMEDIA:

ISNA 2020 POLICY CONFERENCE MULTIMEDIA (Photo/Video Credit: Heather Allman)

Jason Straw- Medical Cannabis Policy

ISNA 2020- Jason Straw- Medical Cannabis Policy

Straw is here to present his academic work on the “Therapeutic Use of Marijuana and Related Cannabinoids,” highlighting the absolute basics of Cannabis use, dosing, effects, and internal mechanisms.

He begins with the question:

How many of you were taught about the Endocannabinoid System in Nusing school?

In a crowd of approximately 75 nurses, only 3  hands go up. Straw uses this educational-hole opportunity to smoothly segue into his thorough educational presentation as found below:

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic Use of Marijuana and Related Cannabinoids 

PURPOSE: 

The purpose of this statement is to reiterate the Indiana State Nurses Association’s (ISNA) support for the review and reclassification of marijuana’s status from a federal Schedule I controlled substances to facilitate urgently needed clinical research to inform patients and providers on the efficacy of marijuana and related cannabinoids.

ISNA POSITION STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND:

Therapeutic Use of Marijuana and Related Cannabinoids—

This position statement speaks only to the use of marijuana and related cannabinoids in the context of health care. It addresses the roles and responsibilities of nurses related to the use of cannabinoids for health care. Statement of ISNA Position Marijuana and its derivatives continue to be used to alleviate disease-related symptoms and side effects.

The findings of anecdotal and controlled studies regarding the efficacy for patient use are mixed. Current federal regulations impede the research necessary to evaluate and determine the therapeutic use of marijuana and related cannabinoids. 

This position statement does not extend to the current debate on the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes. The goal is to develop an evidence-based approach to its use in the treatment of disease and symptom management. 

Recommendations “It is the shared responsibility of professional nursing organizations to speak for nurses collectively in shaping health care and to promulgate change for the improvement of health and health care” (ANA, 2015, p. 36).

 ISNA STRONGLY SUPPORTS

  1. ∙ Scientific review of marijuana’s status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance and relisting marijuana as a federal Schedule II or lower controlled substance for purposes of facilitating research. Development of prescribing standards that includes indications for use, specific dose, route, expected effect and possible side effects, as well as indications for stopping a medication.
  2.  ∙ Establishing evidence-based standards for the use of marijuana and related cannabinoids.
  3.  ∙ Protection from criminal or civil penalties for patients using therapeutic marijuana and related cannabinoids as permitted under state laws.
  4.  ∙ For Indiana State Legislative Body to legalize medical marijuana/cannabis to be recommended by a licensed medical provider or nurse practitioner, for the conditions they see fit to further regulated research and provide compassionate treatment for our patients to advance our scientific knowledge of the benefits of this treatment modality.
  5.  ∙ Exemption from criminal prosecution, civil liability, or professional sanctioning, such as loss of licensure or credentialing, for health care practitioners who discuss treatment alternatives concerning marijuana or who prescribe, dispense or administer marijuana in accordance with professional standards and state laws.”

CANNABINOID BACKGROUND: 

“Marijuana and related cannabinoids are widely used to treat disease or alleviate symptoms, but their efficacy for specific indications is not clear (Whiting et al., 2015). Marijuana has been used for alleviating symptoms of nausea and vomiting; stimulating appetite in HIV patients; alleviating chronic pain; easing spasticity due to multiple sclerosis; decreasing symptoms of depression, anxiety, sleep disorders and psychosis; and relieving intraocular pressure from glaucoma (Whiting, 2015).

Marijuana was widely prescribed in the United States until 1937 when the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 prohibited its use (Musto, 1972). By 1970, the Controlled Substances Act made marijuana illegal.

RECOMMENDATION:

ISNA recommends additional scientific research of marijuana and its related cannabinoids in order to guide evidence-based practice for therapeutic use in patients.

Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of marijuana for some medical purposes. Despite this, the United States Supreme Court voted that Congress had the legal authority to criminalize the use of home grown marijuana even in states where it is legal for therapeutic purposes (Gonzales, 2005). 

As a result, patients and families who gain access to or use marijuana for therapeutic purposes in a state that allows for its use are still at risk for criminal consequences. 

ANA actively supports patients’ rights to legally and safely use marijuana and related cannabinoids for therapeutic symptom management, as well as the nurse’s promotion of quality of life for patients using such therapy.”

—Therapeutic Use of Marijuana and Related Cannabinoids Supersedes American Nurses Association. (2008). Silver Spring, MD: author.

REFERENCES:

¹American Nursing Association: (ANA, 2003). www.nursingworld.org

²American Nurses Association. (2015).

³Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. Silver Spring, MD: www.nursingworld.org/Code-of-Ethics. American Nurses Association. (2003).

Indiana State Nurses Association on Wikipedia.

⁵Providing patients safe access to therapeutic marijuana/cannabis. Washington DC: Author. Drug Enforcement Agency. (2016).

⁶Drug schedules. Retrieved from http://www.dea.gov/druginfo/ds.shtml. Gonzales v. Raich 545 U.S. 1 (2005). Hill, K. P. (2015). 

⁷Medical marijuana for treatment of chronic pain and other medical and psychiatric problems: a clinical review. JAMA, 313(24), 2474-2483. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.6199. Musto, D. F. (1972).

⁸The marihuana tax act of 1937. Archives of General Psychiatry, 26(2), 101-108. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.1972.01750200005002. Nutt, D. (2015).

⁹Illegal drugs laws: Clearing a 50-year-old obstacle to research. PLoS Biol, 13(1), e1002047. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002047. Pub.L. 91-513, 84 Stat. 1236, enacted 1907-10-27, codified at 21 U.S.C. § 801 et. seq. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2016).

¹⁰FDA and marijuana. Retrieved from http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm421163.htm. Whiting, P.F., Wolff, R.F., Deshpande, S., DiNisio, M., Duffy, S., Hernandez, A.V., Keurentjes, Lang, S., Misso, K., Ryder, S., Schmidlkofer, S., Westwood, M., & Kleijnen, J. (2015). 

¹¹Cannabinoids for medical use: A systematic review and metaanalysis. JAMA, 313, 2456-2473. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.6358.

¹²2020 ISNA Policy Conference (Indiana State Nurses Association).


AvatarMark TaylorMarch 2, 2020
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5min270

The UK government has eased import restrictions on medicinal cannabis, but has admitted it needs to do much more to improve access for patients.

Licensed wholesalers will be able to import larger quantities of cannabis-based products, and hold supplies for future use by patients with prescriptions, according to a government release.

Health minister Matt Hancock said on Monday he was acting after meeting several families campaigning for change, and that he would continue to liaise with officials to determine if other barriers could be removed.

The new measures will be implemented by the Home Office and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) from March 2.

Although the UK is the largest legal grower of medicinal cannabis in the world, according to UN statistics, it imports the majority of cannabis-based medicines from foreign countries. 

Restrictions mean it can take weeks or months for the drugs to reach the patients in the UK. In Canada, an export certificate can take 4 to 8 weeks.

Delays can also occur due to safeguards in place to guard against addiction and the misuse of drugs. This means that patients with prescriptions for unlicensed medicines, such as medicinal cannabis, must have their prescription reviewed every 30 days by specialist doctors. 

The move follows the law change in October 2018 to allow specialist doctors to prescribe cannabis-based products for medicinal use where clinically appropriate in the UK, which has been condemned within the UK’s cannabis sector.

By October 29, less than five patients had successfully obtained medicinal cannabis.

The government said it is working with industry to explore further ways to reduce costs and encourage more research into uninterrupted access to cannabis-based medicinal products where clinically appropriate.

It will continue to engage with medical associations and patients to build evidence, using trials in the UK to accelerate our understanding of how medicinal cannabis can benefit patients. “This is necessary for wider prescribing by NHS clinicians in future,” the health  ministry said in a statement.

In November last year, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended 2 cannabis-based medicinal products for patients with multiple sclerosis and hard-to-treat epilepsies.

The Department of Health and Social Care continues to work closely with NHS England-NHS Improvement (NHSE-I) and the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) to establish clinical trials to develop the evidence-base to support further commissioning decisions.

“The changes made today are a tremendous step towards improving the supply of cannabis-based medicinal products by helping to ensure quicker and more reliable access for patients,” said health secretary Hancock. “But we still have a long way to go. We need more research into the quality and safety of these medicines, and to do all we can to cut down the costs and remove barriers so that, when appropriate, patients can access it, including on the NHS.”

The Centre for Medicinal Cannabis (CMC) welcomed the announcement, after lobbying heavily for the changes.

“Today’s announcement will be warmly welcomed by patients, carers, and clinicians alike,” said Dr Andy Yates, CMC Pharmacy Lead. “It’s crucial as we build the evidence required to realise the potential of cannabis-based medicinal products (CBMPs) that there are no unnecessary impediments to accessing prescriptions.”

In mid-April, CMC will be running a Scientific, Clinical & Regulatory Cannabinoid Conference at the British Medical Association in London. 

The event will bring together cannabinoid researchers from around the world and representatives from NIHR, NICE, and the DHSC.


AvatarHeather AllmanFebruary 28, 2020
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37min10

SPLIT DOWN THE MIDDLE

Of late, Florida’s green boom has nothing to do with golf or traditional stereotypes of the Sunshine State, such as stoned retirees and staunch Republicans. In my opinion, it seems that MedMen didn’t get the memo, or they’re busy playing golf. 

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SHORT HONEYMOON?

MedMen—

MedMen operate a number of upscale cannabis dispensaries in California, Nevada, New York, Florida, and other select states, went public at the end of May after buying the British Columbia-based Ladera Ventures.

Acquisitions soon followed: in October, MedMen acquired the medical-marijuana dispensary chain PharmaCann in a $682 million all-stock transaction that almost doubled the combined firm’s footprint overnight.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

TROUBLE IN PARADISE?

MedMen—

MedMen’s stock then tumbled down from $3.25 to about $0.30, and subsequently, the company’s monumental $682 million merger with PharmaCann fell apart in October 2019.

MedMen promptly followed this collapse by laying off about 40% of its corporate workforce in November and December 2019.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

HOPE IN SIGHT?

MedMen—

Meanwhile, Ganjapreneur’s TG Branfalt highlighted the following on October 16, 2019:

Two of Florida’s high-priced medical cannabis licenses are up for sale for a proposed $95 million — $40 million for one, $55 million for the other (which includes a greenhouse and a higher allowance for retail locations).

Two Florida medical cannabis licenses are for sale totaling $95 million, the Tampa Bay Times reports. One $40 million license allows for up to 30 retail stores, while the other $55 million license allows up to 35 and includes a greenhouse.

The licenses are being brokered by Aubrey Logan-Holland, the CEO of Atlanta, Georgia-based firm Blue Dream Industries.

“Whoever acquires this asset will get a chance to stake their claim in one of the biggest medical markets in the world. It’s a good state to do business.” – Logan-Holland, to the Miami Herald, via the Times

Florida’s medical cannabis industry is vertically integrated, which means the license holders are responsible for growing, processing, testing, and selling medical cannabis products.

Jeff Sharkey, lobbyist and director of the state’s Medical Marijuana Business Association, said that, to his knowledge, “all of” the state’s licenses “have been shopped” at some point but “the acquisitions are not as attractive as they were last year.”

According to this October 2019 report, there were about 270,000 medical cannabis patients in Florida registered and Arcview Market research estimates that the state’s industry is expected to generate $1.1 billion in annual revenue by 2022.

MedMen continued their Florida Expansion With Three New Stores in St. Petersburg, Key West and Pensacola— bringing their total to 29 operating stores nationally.

By the way, our qualified medical cannabis patient count in Florida currently stands at over 315,0000 according to the February 21, 2020 OMMU Weekly Update.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • ••

REVELATORY NAME CHANGE?

Surterra (Parallel)—

Simultaneously, Jim Kinney outlined how the Parent company of NETA marijuana shops changes name from Surterra Wellness to Parallel on Oct 07, 2019: “The parent company of New England Treatment Access, which operates medical and recreational marijuana stores in Northampton and Brookline, has changed its name from Surterra Wellness to Parallel. The Georgia-based company, which also operates marijuana businesses in Florida, Texas, and Nevada, bought NETA in January.”

In addition, PRNewswire alo reported that Surterra Wellness Announces Corporate Name Change to Parallel™:

Surterra Wellness today announced that it has changed its corporate name to Parallel™ effective today. Parallel, formerly Surterra Wellness, is a leading, global company that is pioneering human well-being through its proprietary cannabinoid brands and science- and technology-led innovation.

“The introduction of our new parent company brand, under the name Parallel, reflects our transformational growth over the past year and our long-term vision.

We need a corporate name that unites the diverse parts of our organization and all of our associates,” said William “Beau” Wrigley Jr, CEO and Chairman of Parallel.

“We chose the name Parallel because we are improving the well-being of our consumers today through our proprietary, innovative brands while at the same time stepping into the future through robust innovation.We like the name because we see well-being along a spectrum of what quality of life means to different people at different points of their lives, and our brands cover the full range of what they need.”

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Surterra (Parallel)—

 As names go, “Parallel” packs quite a punch. Look at their first merger. On June 17, 2019, Jessica Bartlett highlighted how With Surterra acquisition, cannabis lab plans expansion. Dr. Jeff Karp, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, associate bioengineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and faculty at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Broad Institute and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, said Parallel is “helping lead a team to make a better marijuana product.”

MedMen—

On November 3, 2019, sure enough: Pensacola News Journal reported that MedMen Pensacola opens new dispensary on Bayou Boulevard. For non-local readers, to what is this newly-licensed Florida dispensary location parallel to, you may ask? 

Location: 5048 Bayou Blvd, Pensacola, FL 32503, MedMen via Google

Surterra (Parallel)—

Directly parallel to Surterra, no pun intended.

Location: 5046 Bayou Blvd, Suite A, Pensacola, FL 32503, Surterra via Google

Coincidence? I think not.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

MEDICAL CANNABIS MARKET UP FOR GRABS?

MedMen—

This year has seen MedMen traveling down a rocky road. Jeremy Berke reported for Business Insider in January that Former CEO Bierman was the most recent to depart.

Before his exit, Bierman told Business Insider that “investors were right to punish MedMen’s stock. The investor community and the Street — they don’t really get anything wrong. If our stock is trading at a tremendous discount to our peer set, there’s a reason for it.”

MedMen’s CEO then proceeded to step down on February 1, 2020. As reported by Yeji Jesse Lee on February 27, 2020:

MedMen is discontinuing its Arizona operations — which includes three retail locations as well as cultivation and manufacturing operations. Company leaders also said they were evaluating whether to temporarily or permanently close other stores they think are not profitable. They are also in “active discussions with a number of parties” to spin off factories in different states, according to CFO Zeeshan Hyder.

In addition, marijuana Business Daily published an article on February 1st, 2020 reporting that “In a news release, MedMen said co-founder Andrew Modlin also has agreed to give up his super voting shares by December 2020.”

Surterra (Parallel)—

Jake Bergmann, Founder and former CEO of what are Surterra dispensaries throughout Florida, also stepped down in 2018.

Per PRNewswire, Surterra Wellness Announces Beau Wrigley as New CEO:

“Surterra Wellness Expanded from 100 to over 500 Employees in 2018.

Surterra Wellness (Surterra), one of the nation’s largest providers of medical cannabis, today announced that William “Beau” Wrigley Jr. will assume the role of Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Wrigley became Chairman of Surterra’s Board of Directors in August and has been closely involved with the company since September 2017. Jake Bergmann stepped down as CEO effective Monday, November 5, 2019.”

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

MORE MERGERS AFOOT?

MedMen—

But as Debra Borchardt, Editor-in-Chief of Green Market Report reported in her January 23, 2020 interview with Bierman: “There have been plenty of times where roles have been reversed and we’ve been asked to be partners, long term partners to some of these groups. I think that’s just part of building an industry. There will be times when you’ll be asked to help others out in the industry. And there’ll be times when it’s vice versa.”

This sentiment was put to the test last fall as MadMen and Parallel joined forces in Florida to push through an adult recreational cannabis use petition for the 2020 ballot. Strange bedfellows indeed: apparent Florida competitors working together? Yet, here they are waking up next to each other in the morning.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

PARALLEL + MEDMEN: FUTURE SYNERGISTIC PARTNERS?

In December 2019 edition of Cannabis Business Times, Todd Williams, of Medicine Man Technologies advises “There can be all kinds of synergies, but if the cultures don’t come together, I think you’ve run into a roadblock that can derail a successful acquisition or merger.” Medicine Man Technologies has entered into agreements to become a vertically integrated seed to sale operator.

MedMen + Surterra (Parallel)—

Why is this “synergies factor” so important to this MedMen-Parallel story? Breakfast in bed comes with perks. In Florida, two giant medical cannabis companies who would seem to be rivals started working together on a petition to legalize adult recreational cannabis use in the state of Florida. 

Because one of Parallel’s fellow Florida license-holders Surterra Is A Major Contributor In Push To Legalize Recreational Pot In Florida, as noted by News Service of Florida on October 11, 2019. What happened next will forever be part of Florida medical cannabis history: These 2 Cannabis Companies Kicked In Over $1 Million to Legalize Pot in Florida: Will Their Bets Pay Off?

Sure enough, a fast friendship emerged as MedMen, Parallel pump another $1.08M into adult-use pot initiative, wherein “The two companies are almost single-handedly funding the campaign.”

Surterra was a major donor to a campaign to legalize recreational marijuana in Florida, an effort that now is extended until the 2020 elections.

Another coincidence? I think not.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

REVELATORY FLORIDA DISPENSARY CHANGES?

MedMen—

When they first opened in Pensacola in November 2019, MedMen had cannabis delivery service available, to the delight of the community.

However, it was discontinued within a month due to non-compliance with State of Florida Department of Health regulation that only company cars can be used to make cannabis deliveries. Not sure how they missed that rule; it’s  a big one.

According to the up-to-date, comprehensive medical cannabis patient resource FLDispensaries.com, a privately owned product menu and ordering app, MedMen Marijuana Deliveries RX – Remain UNAVAILABLE:

“MedMen delivery in Pensacola is currently unavailable. When they become active MedMen menu products will be available by delivery in Cantonment, Milton, Navarre and throughout Escambia County.

Please check back for their delivery status as well as MedMens medical marijuana products, menu, reviews, discounts and prices. Many of the Florida cannabis brands are delivering statewide.”

Surterra (Parallel)—

Delivery abruptly dissolved on January 15, 2020, but why? Focus on retail. On January 20, 2020, Jeff Smith of Marijuana Business Daily reported that Large Florida medical cannabis retailer stops most deliveries:

“Surterra Wellness, the second-largest owner of medical marijuana dispensaries in Florida, has eliminated its delivery services except to customers in the Florida Keys.

“The Atlanta-based company, whose corporate parent is now called Parallel, told customers in a notice that it made the adjustments to “optimize” its business. Surterra also cut deliveries because its expanding retail footprint now covers a broad swath of Florida’s population.

Company spokeswoman Kali Caldwell declined to disclose the number of employees affected by the decision.

“We are focusing our efforts on opening new stores in Florida,” Caldwell said in a statement.

“We currently operate 38 retail locations, and over the next year, we will grow that number to 50.”

Surterra is the second-largest seller in Florida of medical marijuana in milligrams but is sixth in smokable flower sales. The company’s dispensaries account for 17% of the state’s total, but its share of milligram sales is only 12.6% and smokable flower sales 5%, according to the state’s latest weekly update.” 

Yet a third coincidence? Absolutely no way.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

MY OPINION?

Concerning the troubled MedMen retail stores and lack of delivery, coupled with Surterra’s hefty retail sales but dissolution of the delivery department, I believe there are three distinct theories. Here are my educated predictions for the future Florida dispensary marketplace, as well as the entire U.S. cannabis industry:

1.  THEORY: THE OLD SWITCHEROO 

I believe that MedMen, parallel to Surterra of Parallel parent company, will become a recreational cannabis retail location, and right next door, Surterra will remain open as a medicinal cannabis retail location, or vice versa.

This prediction is solely an educated guess based on the location of the buildings, the similarities of the company paths of action, and mutual benefits to each. Yes, the parent company name change to “Parallel” around the same time as MedMen canceled their acquisition of PharmCann indeed lends some credence to this theory, in my opinion.

Conversely, Surterra or MedMen could become a merged retail location and the other store location could become a delivery hub only. It’s plausible due to Theory 2 below.

 2. THEORY: MERGER, ACQUISITION, or RTO 

I believe that Surterra’s parent company Parallel will merge or acquire MedMen, or vice versa. Currently, neither location offer delivery, despite being adjacent or parallel to one another in Pensacola physical address.

Surterra is sitting in the catbird seat as far as retail medical cannabis sales are concerned.

According to the most recent weekly update published by Florida’s Office of Medical Marijuana Use on February 21st, 2020 with 39 locations dispensing over 8 million milligrams of (a) medical marijuana, (b) smoking marijuana, and (c) low THC cannabis combined– that’s only for the February 14 to February 20 time frame!

However, competitor-turned-partner MedMen is struggling, to say the least. Just yesterday on Feburary 28, Marijuana Business Daily verified that Multistate cannabis operator MedMen reports $96 million loss:

“California-based MedMen Enterprises, a once-thriving multistate marijuana retailer, released a “grim” quarterly financial report that detailed a whopping $96.4 million net loss in its fiscal 2020 second quarter.

That loss was 49.3% greater than the $64.6 million loss the company reported during the same period in 2018. Its most recent quarter ended Dec. 28, 2019.

On a brighter note, the company, which has marijuana stores in five states, reported that its second-quarter revenues of $44.1 million rose 49.8% from $29.42 million a year earlier.”

3. THEORY: STATE-REGULATED OUTSOURCED DELIVERY

I believe that all of the Florida dispensaries may be required to outsource their delivery to a state-compliant and state-governed delivery service or vendor to be decided at a later date. 

  • Maybe a state compliant or governed security firm?

Read Moving Green: Cannabis and Hemp Transportation on September 5, 2019 by Natasha Winkler.

  • Maybe the “any which way you can” method?

Cannabis store finds a way to deliver where delivery’s not exactly legal on January 16, 2020 by Alex Peters:

“Cannabis delivery services are popular, but questions remain about their legality in many adult-use cannabis states.

For example, in California, where specific delivery license frameworks are in place, cannabis delivery is legal and widely used. Eaze, a San Francisco-based cannabis delivery app, reports that consumers order cannabis every ten seconds via their app.

It was in mid-January 2019 that the Bureau of Cannabis Control in the state of California ruled that marijuana home delivery is permissible for locally approved dispensaries. Marijuana will be allowed to be delivered in communities that are known to have banned the sale of weed. Of course, there are a few critics; some including law enforcement.

Marijuana dispensary owners will have a daunting task getting the weed to the consumers, especially if they have not prepared for it beforehand. On the other hand, the marijuana home Marijuana home delivery will now make it possible for these people to have access to legal marijuana. However, the dispensary has to be legally licensed for marijuana home delivery.”

  • Maybe cannabis drones?

On January 20, 2020, Peters returned with Flying high: Are cannabis drone deliveries the future or merely fantasy?  

“There’s been a spate of recent speculation about the role drones might play in future cannabis deliveries. The issue resides precariously at the intersection of modern technology, ever-evolving and ever-confusing legislation, and a cannabis industry booming in all directions. Plus, there’s no denying the fact that drones filling the skies with Purple Punch and Sour Diesel is the stuff of so many futuristic fantasies. But is it possible?

As the demand for cannabis steadily grows, so does the need for efficient delivery from business to business. Currently, the sector favors privately-owned van fleets like those utilized by Sasquatch Logistics in Washington.”

  • Maybe FedEx, USPS or Amazon?

FedEx, UPS jockey with Amazon as tech giant expands into shipping on September 1, 2019 by Jesse Pound:

FedEx is expanding delivery service to seven days per week all year, but it ended its ground delivery contract with Amazon.

UPS is exploring using drones and self-driving trucks.

Amazon has built up its own transportation network, including a fleet of cargo planes.

The years-long battle between Amazon and retail companies has spilled over into the shipping industry.

FedEx has announced two changes to its relationship to Amazon in recent months, including ending the ground delivery contract with the e-commerce pioneer. Meanwhile, UPS is exploring new technologies, such as drones and self-driving trucks, to modernize its delivery services.

The moves come as Amazon is building up its delivery fleet, renting planes and offering $10,000 to its employees to leave the company and start their own local delivery business.

Amazon started using the U.S. Postal Service more after the delivery companies struggled to deliver packages on time during the 2013 holiday season, Ross said.”

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •

These predictions are only my opinion and with all the whirlwind of cannabis news flying fast and hard, your guess for the ACTUAL future of these two companies is as valid as mine.

Have at it and we’ll let the nugs fall where they may. I will be here legally medicating in the meantime.

Opinion by Heather Allman, Author

Cannabis Law Report, Publisher


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonFebruary 21, 2020
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5min8380

Editor’s Note: This story was originally published on our sister site Hemp Market Report.

Amidst concerns on the federal and state levels about violations of FDA regulations regarding CBD products, efforts are being made to allocate more money in the upcoming fiscal year to further define and more stringently enforce CBD laws. President Trump’s proposed budget for the fiscal year 2021, should he gain re-election and have the opportunity to present it to Congress, allocates an additional $5 million to the Food and Drug Administration specifically for further regulation and law enforcement pertaining to cannabis and cannabis-derived products. This is the first time that CBD has been mentioned in a federal budget proposal, which suggests that hemp and CBD may be buzzwords cropping up in Presidential debate topics alongside marijuana leading up to the election.

So where would it leave the future of CBD regulation if Trump is ousted from the White House? Democratic Presidential frontrunners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren both support the legalization of cannabis, with Sanders proposing to legalize within 100 days of his election to office. A historically outspoken proponent of the war on drugs, Joe Biden is sticking to a half-measure platform with a focus on decriminalization, allowing states to regulate hemp for themselves. Michael Bloomberg supports putting legalization in the hands of individual states, though he is personally opposed to legalization. Pete Buttigieg takes the side of veterans with PTSD who often use cannabis and its derivatives to deal with the aftermath of military service, advocating for the decriminalization of all controlled substances. 

As hemp has yet to be a talking point for presidential candidates, overshadowed as it is by the larger topic of marijuana as a flashpoint for racial justice issues (as criminalization disproportionately affects people of color), what Americans can expect from future budgetary support should a Democrat win office is unclear. What is clear is that the time for comprehensive, consistent regulations and enforcement of cannabis laws on the part of the FDA is long overdue.

  During his January 2020 testimony before the Subcommittee on Health, Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the U.S. House of Representatives, Douglas C. Throckmorton, Deputy Director for Regulatory Programs at the FDA, highlighted the current illegality (per the Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act)  of interstate commerce of food with CBD additives. He also described in some detail concerns with current CBD marketing tactics that put consumers at risk, such as those products that claim to treat cancer or Alzheimer’s. Throckmorton also identified some particular concerns related to the potential negative health impacts of CBD use, such as liver damage, problematic drug interactions, male reproductive toxicity, and various ill side effects. 

While studies of these impacts are still ongoing and inconclusive, the FDA is clearly intent on taking them, and the future of CBD in the U.S. market, seriously. Whether the President-elect of the United States, whoever he or she may be, manages to pass a budget that supports the FDA in its mission to ensure public safety in regards to CBD is, in many respects, for voters to decide.


Colette TozerColette TozerFebruary 10, 2020
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4min3240

Editors Note: You can follow all the legislation around cannabis on our website for free by clicking on the Legislation tab. 

2020 started with legislation siding entirely in favor of Cannabis throughout twelve states US (and the District of Columbia). Aside from full legalization, more than 75% of the United States of America have legalized (and decriminalized) Cannabis use. Whether that use is in the form of CBD, restricted to medicinal use, or completely without consequence, America’s legislation is changing rapidly.

The legalization of Cannabis has been a slow, agonizing, and long-overdue struggle that has finally started to see some quantifiable traction. Finally, the taboo haze that has encircled the use of Cannabis is lifted. For the first time in a long time, lawmakers are representing what the people want and what science supports concerning benefits and safety.

Fortunately, it is apparent from rising trends that the new decade is going to be immersed in a wave of green, as more states loosen the reigns that have been unnecessarily stifling the Cannabis industry for generations.

Legalization is Sweeping the Nation

The new decade started with Illinois celebrating its June 2019 legalization victory and now, New Mexico is following suit. New Mexico’s governor, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, is currently pushing legalization.

Furthermore, US News reported on the turn of the decade, that there is strong legislative evidence five more states are rolling toward legalization before 2020 comes to a close.

While there are still some obvious hurtles throughout the different states, that include political as well as practical issues, legalization seems to be rising high throughout the country.

Entrepreneurial Success Supports Legalization

While people tend to steer clear of the monetary gain Cannabis legalization offers, the entrepreneurial crowd is not shy about the benefits. Statista claims that by 2020, the total number of jobs created by legalizing Cannabis is projected to exceed 283,422. This includes not only the production and sales of Cannabis but the marketing, economical predictions, influencer, and other niche job creation that would accompany any other industry.

Legalization is Giving People the Help they Need

The change in Cannabis laws has helped to promote the abundance of benefits Cannabis holds for people of all ages. Cannabis use has helped 71% of surveyed consumers as of 2018 either reduce (53%) or stop (18%) their over-the-counter pain treatment. This, especially for the older generation is an extremely positive statistic; giving those with chronic pain a healthier alternative to OTC pain medication.

Plus, for the younger generation, the survey concluded that 60% of participants have reduced (52%) or stopped (7%) their alcohol consumption.

Both statistics deliver major blows to pharmaceutical companies and the alcohol industry. These two industries collectively cost the U.S. economy over $600 billion every year due to addiction. Cutting down the number of people who partake or the amount they partake in these dangerous habits are not only a benefit to the individual but our whole society.

All this, in addition to the mounting public support, proves that 2020 promises greener pastures for Cannabis legislation.

 



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The Green Market Report focuses on the financial news of the rapidly growing cannabis industry. Our target approach filters out the daily noise and does a deep dive into the financial, business and economic side of the cannabis industry. Our team is cultivating the industry’s critical news into one source and providing open source insights and data analysis


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