Cannaclusive Archives - Green Market Report

StaffMarch 7, 2022
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3min5390

CANNACLUSIVE

MARY PRYOR – COFOUNDER, CANNACLUSIVE

What is your proudest accomplishment in the cannabis industry?

We’re excited about the launch and continuation of our work with various companies and brands on their inclusion strategies and marketing needs. Alongside that, I’m glad that the community relies on us for that along with quality information.

Do you feel that the cannabis industry has more opportunities for female-identifying people than other industries?

Honestly, I think that women need to build more community and mentorship amongst each other in order to create and sustain opportunities in cannabis overall.

 

Do you feel you have to work twice as hard as male colleagues or do you think the industry has moved past that?

Women have to work 100 times as hard. Twice as hard seems to be seen as not enough and it’s really concerning given how many amazing women I know in cannabis.

 

What was your biggest challenge in business and how did you overcome it?

Our business challenge is capital. And it’s something we are working to change this year.

 

What have you or your company done to help give more opportunities for women?

We’ve generated funding and monetary support dollars for entities that are part of Cannabis for Black Lives and we’ve connected a lot of dots when it comes to extended and job opportunities with other brands in the space.

 

What are your personal goals for 2022?

 

Preparing for larger collaborations, expanding Inclusivebase, and finding better ways to create balance and fun for everyone who is taking the time to help us evolve.

 


StaffFebruary 17, 2022
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3min7710

Cannaclusive

Jordan Watson / Creative Consultant

**Pronouns**: He/him

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

I formally entered the space back in 2016 during the prop 215 days that was my first formal introduction to the cannabis space.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?

I fell in love with the people. I came from luxury fragrance – a world that was very refined and where I sold things that did nothing to help people. I wanted to be an industry where I could really make a difference.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

In terms of traditional vs our industry, yes there are more opportunities. In terms of opportunities in general, there should be more! Our entire industry is built on a foundation of cages filled with black and brown women and men. We should see more of them as the faces leading the industry.

What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

I am a huge fan of the work of Hilary Yu and Our Academy. They help social equity brands gain access to funding and resources to make it on the market with their 15-week program. I really admire Hilary and the entire Our Academy team for the work they do to help create more space for social equity in our industry.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

My personal goal is to continue to enjoy myself and spread that joy to others, and more importantly I want to see all of the powerful WOMEN in this industry that are so often overlooked WIN! Sorry not sorry fellas, but it’s time for the ladies to get the flowers they deserve!


StaffFebruary 11, 2022
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6min7510

Cannaclusive

Devlon “DJ” Howard / Project Manager at Cannaclusive / Florida State Director of Minorities for Medical Marijuana / Co-Founder of Saved by the Treats

**Pronouns**: He/him

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

Although I started dabbling in the cannabis space in 2017, it wasn’t until 2020 when the company I was working for was acquired and then dissolved, that I fully immersed myself into the industry. Getting laid off of what I thought was a pretty sweet job in corporate America that I had put so much into made me realize if I was going to work, it had to be something that felt like I was making a true impact on people’s lives. Yes, it has to be fun and enjoyable, but it has to move me. Anything else just seemed like a waste of my time.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?

I originally became interested in working in the cannabis industry in 2017 when I was arrested for a misdemeanor possession charge in Virginia, and around the same time my girlfriend became very sick. The same cannabis that I was on probation for was helping her treat what we would later learn was stage 4 endometriosis. I realized, at a very basic level, how the same plant that was helping treat what doctors couldn’t, was being weaponized against people and specifically, at an alarming rate over decades, Black people. Understanding how powerful the plant is, how much money was being made off of it, and how many people were in prison and dealing with negative ramifications of the War on Drugs, has fueled me to find a place for myself and bring along more BIPOC people into this industry.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

I think there SHOULD BE more opportunities for Black Americans in the cannabis industry and in traditional industries. Specifically in cannabis though, Black Americans are owed more opportunities for a few reasons. Black Americans know cannabis from cultivation to consumerism -it’s not new to us. Black people have been budtenders before it was a term and cultivators since before people were classifying the plant by terpene profiles. Cannabis being legal is new to us, as it is for everyone; so when you consider the legal market, Black Americans have tons of knowledge that could help these MSOs. Black Americans have also been victims of the War on Drugs for multiple generations. Whether thrown in a cage, placed on probation, held back from career opportunities, not having a parent home because of legal issues and being separated from family, stop and frisk and PTSD from negative police interactions, lack of viable medical options, all of these things have happened to Black Americans at a far higher rate than any other group of people. For this industry to be projected to generate $50 billion in revenue before this decade is over and Black people not be a direct beneficiary is simply a continuation of the War on Drugs. Some might argue, it’s worse.

What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

Social equity is such an important and necessary cause that choosing one program that is the best is really tough because social equity impact can happen in many ways. I love the work that Hood Incubator has done and continues to do as well as Supernova Women. I also admire what Our Academy and Hilary Yu do with helping BIPOC business owners. I can’t leave out Minorities for Medical Marijuana which pushes education, expungement and legislative initiatives that advocate for minorities in states across the country.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

My personal goal for 2022 is to continue enjoying working in cannabis and help bring more opportunities to BIPOC folx, whether they are business owners or interested in working at a cannabis company. I also want to connect in person with more of my canna-community that I’ve grown to love and love to support!


StaffFebruary 8, 2022
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5min6750

Cannaclusive

Kassia Graham / Director of Community & Strategy, Cannaclusive

**Pronouns**: She/her/they/them

When did you formally enter the cannabis space?

I entered the cannabis space in late 2017 and began working with Cannaclusive. Since then I’ve had the opportunity to work within the United States and Europe.

What made you decide to work in the cannabis industry?

I’ve always had an interest in plant medicine with a focus on hemp and cannabis. My early years were spent in Jamaica and one of my great uncles who was a Rastafarian grew cannabis at home. It’s always been a part of my life in a very intimate way. He taught my mother how to make tinctures and other cannabis-based goods to aid with various ailments.

Cannabis helped me during back-to-back battles with Hodgkins Lymphoma, and a stem cell transplant. It helped to provide pain relief and aided with my appetite.

Hemp and cannabis have so much to offer the world; I see them as a medium for self-expression, creativity, love, exploration, and more. In addition to medicinal and adult-use benefits there are additional applications for the plants. I’m excited to see where research and innovation take us.

Do you feel there is more opportunity for Black Americans in the cannabis industry versus a more traditional industry? Yes or no and why?

I believe the myth of cannabis being more accessible to Black people is something we have to be mindful of sharing. There is still a great deal of disparity when it comes to ownership and hiring at all levels. Also, being in the industry on the plant-touching side is wildly expensive and filled with red tape; something rarely discussed.

However, I feel Black people and others impacted by the War on Drugs should have resources to aid entry and sustainability in the cannabis industry. This means fair access to loans, grants, banking, record expungement, and more.

What is the most successful social equity effort in your opinion? Can be a charity or company program.

Though many have been hopeful, cannabis equity programs on the state level have not been successful. There are still too many barriers for operators of color and the formerly incarcerated; especially those who are Black and Latine.

From what I’ve seen industry and community-based cannabis equity efforts are doing what adult-use states attempted to do but on a much smaller scale. Via heading the leadership team at Cannabis for Black Lives our members and team have been able to aid in fundraising for, and amplifying organizations including Supernova Women, The Hood Incubator, Our Academy, Equitable Opportunities Now, and more. Those cannabis equity-centered organizations are committed to giving their communities––impacted by the War on Drugs––the tools necessary to build and sustain businesses, and to advocate for themselves and others.

What is your personal goal for 2022?

In 2022 one of my goals includes creating more space for disabled, BIPOC, and queer people outside of the often lazy DEI framework used in cannabis. We focus so much on the black and white that we miss many things in between as well as in the margins. Cannabis should be a more welcoming industry due to the role many marginalized people have played in its past, present, and soon, the future.

In addition to what’s already been stated, I want to turn more eyes towards innovation in multiple parts of the industry. However, I want these conversations to be accessible to all, including those new to cannabis and plant medicine.


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The Green Market Report focuses on the financial news of the rapidly growing cannabis industry. Our target approach filters out the daily noise and does a deep dive into the financial, business and economic side of the cannabis industry. Our team is cultivating the industry’s critical news into one source and providing open source insights and data analysis


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