wine Archives - Green Market Report

StaffStaffMay 13, 2019
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5min8241

Infused beverages are a growing trend in the cannabis industry. According to the food and drink consultancy group Zenith Global, sales of cannabis-infused beverages are expected to reach $1.4 billion by the year 2024.

While most companies, like Lagunitas or Constellation Brands, are focused on dominating the cannabis beer market, a smaller group of brands are aiming at filling the demand for cannabis wine. One such company is House of Saka.

Formed by women for women, House of Saka is a brand dedicated to the development of luxury-infused relaxation, beauty & wellness products for sophisticated cannabis consumers around the world. Last month the company officially debuted its line of luxury infused beverages, dubbed Saka Infusions, at an exclusive launch party in Napa Valley, California.

Serendipitously taking place during the rise of the Pink Moon, House of Saka premiered its pink cannabis beverages inspired by Rosé wines before an audience of top executives from throughout the wine industry, beer industry, and cannabis industry. The event was organized by Nicki Wolfe, one of the wine country’s most premier event planners.

“Boldness and innovation is the key to the new cannabis game, so when House of Saka Founder Cynthia Salarizadeh approached me, I said, I’m in, as long as I can make it unique, special, and focused on the guest experience,” said Wolfe. “We wanted House of Saka’s launch to exemplify all that is special about wine country.”

Called High Fete: The Most Luxurious Evening in Cannabis, the event lived up to its name; featuring extravagant décor and a sumptuous selection of appetizers, beverages, and a full-course meal that featured vegan, vegetarian, and gluten-free options. Interspersed throughout the venue were samples of Saka, allowing the guests to try the infused beverage for the first time.

As the four-hour event came to a close, House of Saka founders Cynthia Salarizadeh and Tracey Mason were on hand to thank their guests and reaffirm their brand’s mission.

“The concept for the House of Saka was to build the perfect luxury brand owned and operated by the most powerful and influential businesswomen across cannabis and wine, and we are confident that we have achieved this,” said Salarizadeh.

 

“From that start, we envisioned House of Saka to set the bar for female-centric, infused-luxury products in both the cannabis and CBD space,” added Mason. “Brands like House of Saka are the future of the industry and a platform from which we hope to inspire female entrepreneurs and draw women toward the extraordinary plant that is cannabis.”  

 

 

 


Peggi CloughPeggi CloughMay 9, 2018
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4min17500

In states where legalization has occurred, recreational marijuana consumers are now using far less alcohol and over-the-counter medications, according to a new report by High Yield Insights.

The consumer behavior company looked at feedback from recreational users in states where recreational cannabis is legal. They found that more than 20 percent of people who consume marijuana recreationally are using 27 percent less OTC pain relievers and 21 percent less alcoholic beverages. Those weren’t the only steep drops found, either. The report also indicated those consumers are using 22 percent fewer sleep aids, consuming 20 percent less beer, and 18 percent less wine.

“We are just starting to grasp how legalization has impacted consumer behavior, be it spending, usage occasions, or shopping habits. Understanding these changes will lead to new growth opportunities for cannabis and further disruption for other categories,” said Mike Luce, co-founder of HighYield Insights. “Our findings uncovered promising consumer niches for the industry as well. For example, many older consumers 55+ are reengaging with marijuana, with 56 percent reporting a return to marijuana after having tried cannabis products at a younger age.”

The High Yield Insights report concluded that people are using recreational cannabis for pain, anxiety, and sleep due to the fact that the largest total decline in use was in pharmaceuticals. Prescription pain reliever use dropped 13 percent; anxiety medications, 13 percent; and prescription sleep aids, 11 percent.

According to the survey, when asked which type of occasion they typically use cannabis for, the top answers were for relaxation, as a sleep aid and to socialize at casual get-togethers. Other reasons or occasions included creativity, anxiety and before a meal with a friend or partner. People between the ages of 35-44 were more likely to use cannabis for relaxation, while younger consumers used it before various social activities.

Nearly half of the people surveyed use marijuana multiple times a week. Men are more likely to be heavy users, with 50 percent of them using it multiple times a week. Women were close behind at 47 percent. Sixteen percent of consumers use cannabis 3-4 times a month, while 13 percent use 1-2 times a month. Twenty-one percent of people surveyed use cannabis less than once a month.

The report showed that convenient forms, such as edibles and pre-rolls, are in high demand.
It concluded that packaging explaining a product’s effects is necessary to assist people who may not be familiar with the strain they’re purchasing.

The survey found that 65 percent of recreational cannabis consumers see legalization as positive for their communities, even though some are concerned with underage users.

High Yield Insights believes the report can be used by everyone in the cannabis industry to better understand consumers and their wants and needs. More information can be found in their “Recreational Cannabis Consumer” report.


William SumnerWilliam SumnerApril 4, 2018
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6min28970

From Mesopotamia to ancient Rome, people have been infusing alcohol with cannabis for as long as cannabis has been around. In recent years, cannabis-infused alcohol has seen a resurgence of public interest, due largely to the spread of legalized cannabis in the United States. Most recently, the creators of Blue Moon announced that they would develop and release their own brand of craft cannabis beer.

But while cannabis beer and liquors have generated some interest, the bulk of the public’s attention has been centered squarely on the idea of cannabis wine, or cannawine as some call it, and it is easy to see why. Both cannabis and wine have a rich tradition of craftsmanship, which perfectly lends itself to the artisanal craft markets.

Perhaps the most famous brand of cannawine on the market at the moment is Know Label Wine Tincture, which is owned by singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge. As the name implies, Know Label is technically not a wine but rather a “wine tincture.” The reason why it’s called a tincture is largely for legal purposes.

No U.S. state allows for the production of cannabis-infused alcoholic products. By calling Know Label a tincture, which is defined as “a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol,” and by only selling it to medical cannabis patients, Etheridge is able to just barely skirt around the law. Other brands aren’t so lucky.

Currently, Know Label is the only product on the market that offers both THC and alcohol in one product.  Instead, most other “cannabis-infused” alcoholic products on the market, from cannabis vodka to cannawine,  will usually contain cannabidiol (CBD); a trend which Warren Bobrow finds disappointing and dishonest.

Known as the Cocktail Whisperer, Bobrow is a chef and mixologist who has made a name for himself in recent years as a cannabis cocktail guru. In 2016, Bobrow wrote the book “Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations,” a how-to guide on creating cannabis-infused cocktails.

“They’re selling these hemp-flavored vodkas, and people see the marijuana leaf and immediately think they’re going to get high,” lamented Bobrow. “This is a product that has absolutely no THC, yet it is being framed as sold as something that gets you stoned, and I have a lot of difficulty with that.”

Bobrow went on to say that not only do many of these products pull a bait-and-switch, they’re also generally poor products to begin with. One brand in particular that Bobrow singled out was the California-based Mary Jane Wines, which he described as tasting like a “muddled mess.”

“The wine was out of balance,” added Bobrow. “There were no refreshing qualities and it certainly didn’t taste like something that I would be proud to serve on my dinner table.”

But while some try to pull a bait-and-switch or skirt the law by reclassifying their product, other brands are trying to redefine what cannawine means altogether, like Rebel Coast Winery. Offering a cannabis-infused sauvignon blanc, Rebel Coast sets its cannawine apart by taking out the alcohol and leaving in the THC.

To do this the company makes a normal batch of sauvignon blanc, which is then sent to a third party processor to remove the alcohol. The company then infuses the alcohol-free wine with cannabis using a proprietary process. According to Rebel Coast Co-Founder & Chief Operations Officer, Alex Howe, the end result is a product that tastes very similar to regular bottle but with a cannabis kick.

“One aspect that we have probably put the most time and resources into is making it taste it good, ” said Howe. “We’re trying to stay as close to the wine bottle experience as possible, we’re just swapping out one key component for another.”

Rebel Coast’s cannawine is not quite on the market yet, but you can pre-order a bottle online. Pending a successful rollout, the company hopes to start selling their cannawine in states outside of California where cannabis is legal.

So far that looks more like an inevitability than a maybe. The company has already received a large number of pre-orders for their cannawine, which Howe believes is thanks in large part to the massive consumer interest in finding an alternative to alcohol.

“I meet so many people who have either given up drinking or are looking to cut back on alcohol because they don’t like the negative side effects, and they’re looking for a better alternative,” said Howe. “I think a lot of people look to cannabis as that alternative.”

Not a big fan of wine? Not to worry, cannabis and hemp based beers are quickly coming to market. Stay tuned for when Green Market Report takes you into the world of cannabis beer.



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The Green Market Report focuses on the financial news of the rapidly growing cannabis industry. Our target approach filters out the daily noise and does a deep dive into the financial, business and economic side of the cannabis industry. Our team is cultivating the industry’s critical news into one source and providing open source insights and data analysis


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